Clinton Challenges Trump-Supporting Republicans | NBC 7 San Diego
Decision 2016

Decision 2016

Full coverage of the race for the White House

Clinton Challenges Trump-Supporting Republicans

Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta says Republicans have to answer whether they are with Trump or against him



    Andrew Harnik, AP
    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a rally at the Colorado State Fairgrounds in Pueblo, Colo., on Oct. 12, 2016.

    Hillary Clinton showed a little sympathy Wednesday for Donald Trump supporters who disrupted her campaign event in Colorado.

    "You have to feel a little sorry for them, they've had a really bad couple of weeks," Clinton said as security escorted one man out of Pueblo rally.

    Clinton called out Republicans still backing Trump despite his caught-on-tape boasts about groping women. The strategy is the latest sign the campaign is moving past a narrow focus on winning the White House, and now is aiming to win big — by delivering the Senate to Democrats, making deep cuts into Republicans' majority in the House and, possibly, winning states long considered Republican territory.

    The Democratic presidential candidate and her surrogates, including President Barack Obama, in recent days have begun to pressure Republican candidates on the stump, particularly as Trump has declared he feels unshackled to launch the sort of hard-edged, personal campaign his most ardent supporters have long wanted.

    Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta says Trump's strategy appears to be trying to "disgust" voters so they don't show up to vote.

    Clinton is also scheduled to headline a rally at 7:30 p.m. PT at the Smith Center for the Performing Arts in Las Vegas, Nevada. She'll appear with Senate candidate and former Nevada Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto.

    The rally comes as Cortez Masto trails slightly in recent polls in the race to replace retiring Sen. Harry Reid. The contest could decide which party holds the majority in the U.S. Senate.

    Clinton's campaign raised the curtain on her visit by releasing new ads in Spanish featuring prominent Nevada DREAMer Astrid Silva, who talks about the risks to her if Donald Trump is elected and makes good on his immigration campaign promises.

    Michelle Obama: When They Go Low We Go High By Voting

    [NATL] Michelle Obama: When They Go Low We Go High By Voting
    Presidential elections are decided on a “razor’s edge,” Michelle Obama told a crowd at a campaign event in North Carolina where she spoke after Hillary Clinton on Oct. 27. The first lady got a loud round of applause when she pointed out what previous generations sacrificed for the right to vote, and encouraged everyone to exercise that right.

    “Casting our vote is the ultimate way we go high when they go low,” Obama said, “Voting is our high.” (Published 2 hours ago)