Students Urge Voters to 'Save the Bag Ban' - NBC 7 San Diego

Students Urge Voters to 'Save the Bag Ban'

A November 2016 ballot measure will allow California voters to decide whether to end the nation's first statewide ban on plastic grocery bags.

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    Students Urge Voters to 'Save the Bag Ban'
    NBC 7
    Students stop in Pacific Beach as part of a statewide tour promoting 'Save the Bag Ban.'

    College students stopped in San Diego Friday to urge voters to "Save the Bag Ban" and vote for a ballot measure that will stop single-use of plastic bags in stores across the state. 

    A November 2016 ballot measure will allow California voters to decide whether to keep the nation's first statewide ban on plastic grocery bags.

    In September 2014, Governor Jerry Brown signed a law banning single-use plastic bags.

    In response, the American Progressive Bag Alliance collected enough signatures to get the issue in front of voters as a  veto referendum. 

    The group argues that the ban amounts to a cash giveaway to grocers that would lead to a loss of thousands of manufacturing jobs.

    A "No" vote would overturn Senate Bill 270.

    So college students with the consumer group CALPIRG and environmental groups, including the Surfrider Foundation toured the state over spring break to remind voters to keep the ban in place.

    On Friday, the students stopped in Pacific Beach. They’ve registered voters and visited classrooms as part of a public awareness campaign called "Save the Bag Ban."

    “These students are here because they believe a piece of plastic that you use for 5 minutes should not pollute your ocean for hundreds of years,” said organizer Gayle Schwartzberg.

    More than 147 cities and counties already ban single us plastic bags.

    A "Yes" vote on the referendum would stop the use of plastic carryout bags at large grocery stores and pharmacies. Small grocery stores, convenience stores and liquor stores would stop using them the following year.

    Plastic bags would be permitted for meat, bread, produce, bulk food and perishable items.

    Stores could also charge only $.10 for recyclable and compostable bags.