San Diego Panda Cub's Exam Shared Live on Social Media

It was the first exam for the panda cub born July 29 at the San Diego Zoo

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    NEWSLETTERS

    When San Diego Zoo veterinarians got the chance to examine the park’s newest baby panda, fans around the world followed the event via Twitter.

    The exam, scheduled for 6:30 a.m. PT, was the first for the baby born July 29, 2012.

    When mama Bai Yun stepped out of the den for breakfast, Twitter followers were taken inside the exam room through Instagram images.

    Then, as if to complete the social media trifecta, the zoo posted the cub’s weight to its 171,000 Facebook fans with a fresh close-up image taken by a park photographer.

    Panda Cub First Exam: Raw Video

    [DGO] Panda Cub First Exam: Raw Video
    Raw video provided by the San Diego Zoo showing the first examination of Bai Yun's cub on August 23, 2012.

    “1.5lbs. & healthy as can be,” the post read.

    The cub's heart and lungs appeared to be strong according to an official post-exam news release, “The cub was calm, only vocalizing a few times during the exam, demonstrating its strong lungs."

    This live Twitter feed of its first medical exam is just par for the course for a cub whose every moment can be monitored around the world on the park’s live web “panda cam.”

    It's an easy way for anyone to see what's happening inside the panda birthing den 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

    And it appears to have captured the attention of more than a few panda fans.

    “I am addicted to watching this little baby and it's mama on the panda cam! “ posted Kimberley Fleming Webb of Oxford, Ala.

    “I haven't missed a day of Panda Cam since the baby was born,” said zoo FB follower Marcia Carver Buck-Kimmel.

    And, just what the zoo, and San Diego tourism boosters, love to see: “Aww booked our flights will be over again next June to see your amazing panda family,” from Karen Levy of London.

    Next up will be determining the sex of the newest member of the panda family. Staffers were unable to accurately spot the gender during the three-minute exam and say they hope to discover if it’s male or female in follow-up exams.

    It's Chinese tradition to wait to announce the name for the cub until it has reached the 100-day milestone. The tradition has been honored for all five other giant panda cubs born to Bai Yun here in San Diego.

    Got an idea for a name? Let us know! Comment below, send us your thoughts via Twitter @nbcsandiego or add your comment to our Facebook page.