Dub the Cub: It's Time to Name the Panda

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    NEWSLETTERS

    AP
    In 1999, Bai Yun gave birth at the San Diego Zoo to the first surviving giant panda born in the United States. She has since given birth to cubs in 2003, 2005, 2007 and, most recently, on Aug. 5. This is Bai Yun's second male cub. Bai Yun and the cub will remain in the den for four to five months.

    Bai Yun’s fifth bundle of joy is getting very close to having a name!

    Starting today, the public will get a chance to give San Diego Zoo’s newest giant panda cub something to go by.
    The zoo baby has been nameless since it’s birth in August.  The reason for the wait—Chinese tradition.  Giant panda cubs are not named until they are 100 days old.
    Zoo visitors are being asked to drop off names for the cub at the Giant Panda Research station through Oct. 19.
    The very next day, the zoo's panda team, comprised of keepers, veterinarians, scientists and others, will select a few suggested names to the Chinese Wildlife Conservation Association, who will have the final say on the choices for the public to vote on.  Voting will take places at SanDiegoZoo.org and the zoo's Facebook page.
    With naming comes a few stipulations. 
    “The names should be in Chinese [Pinyin], have an English translation [and] be symbolic in meaning," according to a news release issued by the zoo.
    The name that grabs the most votes will be announced on Nov. 17.
    If you have any ideas, let us know. Comment below, send us your thoughts via Twitter @nbcsandiego or add your comment to our Facebook page.