2 Navy Crew Members Remain in Hospital After Chopper Hard Landing

Four crew members total were involved in the December 12 crash landing on Coronado

By R. Stickney and Lauren Steussy
|  Thursday, Dec 27, 2012  |  Updated 2:33 PM PDT
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Four people were hospitalized after a U.S. Navy helicopter made a crash landing at a San Diego area military base. NBC 7's Marianne Kushi reports.

Four people were hospitalized after a U.S. Navy helicopter made a crash landing at a San Diego area military base. NBC 7's Marianne Kushi reports.

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Two aircrew members of a crashed U.S. Navy helicopter have yet to be released from the hospital after two weeks of receiving treatment, Navy officials said Thursday. 

The December 12 incident occurred around 11:15 p.m. at Naval Air Station North Island on Coronado.

According to officials, the helicopter was operated by four aircrew personnel assigned to Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron-75, also known as the Wolfpack.

Two of the injured were transported to UCSD Medical Center. Another two people were taken to Scripps Mercy hospital.

Two of the crew members were released from the hospital. The other two remain in the hospital and are in "stable" condition, according to a Navy spokesperson. 

One is now at the Naval Medical Center San Diego and the other is at Alvarado hospital. 

Their injuries ranged from broken bones to scrapes, NBC News reported at the time of the crash. 

The helicopter, a Navy MH-60 Romeo Seahawk helicopter, crashed during a routine training.

The Seahawk is the Navy's primary anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare helicopter. It has several secondary missions that range from search and rescue, to relaying communications.

Seahawks are typically operated by two pilots, a sensor operator, and depending on the mission - an additional sensor operator or a rescue swimmer.

The crash was being called a "Class A Mishap" by the Navy. This is the most serious type of mishap. And a crash is designated as "Class A" when there is damage in excess of $2 million or loss of life.

An investigation into the crash is progressing, and no further information was available Thursday. 

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