Class Warfare: Texting at Schools

Student admit texting in class

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    clipart.com

    No matter what the rules say, 43 percent of high school students admit to texting in the classroom. 

    Many schools have strict policies against texting in class, and many teachers take away phones from students who are caught texting, but, apparently, not many are caught. According to a survey conducted by textPlus, a business that offers a free group-texting application, nearly 80 percent of teens surveyed said they've never gotten in trouble for texting in class.

    According to the survey, banning texting in class is almost impossible.

    Class Warfare: Texting at Schools

    [DGO] Class Warfare: Texting at Schools
    Despite strict policies, nearly half of high-schoolers are texting in the classroom.

    "There have been notes in class, there has been talking with friends -- this is just another tool," said Drew Olanoff with textPlus. 

    The survey asked teens 13 to 17 how often they text in class, and 17 percent said they do it "constantly."

    "The teachers don't like it, but the kids try to hide it," said high school junior Caleb Wilcox. 

    As for the 43 percent who text in class? 

    "I would actually think it would be more," Caleb said.

    According to the textPlus survey, only 26 percent of students think it's wrong to text during class. More than half say they text with friends who are actually sitting in the same classroom.

    But it's not just the students who are doing the texting, according to Olanoff. 

    "We found that 66 percent of the kids said that their parents text them during the school day," Olanoff said.

    "I will text and pray that their phone is off," said Cheryl Quackenbush, who has a son in high school.