Education Nation

Education Nation

A solutions-focused conversation about the state of education in America

Schools Plan Worst-Case Scenario for 2012 Budget

Board to propose 1,000 layoffs and other big cuts - fiscal responsibility or a way to send a message to voters?

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    San Diego Unified School District is just one of California's districts trying to plan for the unknown.

    San Diego Unified School board members will meet Tuesday evening to discuss a budget plan or the 2012-2013 school year.

    For parents and staffers the plan will be a worst-case scenario for the district that is facing insolvency.

    Parents have heard the threats for several months – without concessions from unions and funds from a proposed tax that will be on the next ballot, the district will outline a budget that includes larger class sizes, cuts to programs and layoffs.

    SDUSD Board Meets to Discuss Budget

    [DGO] SDUSD Board Meets to Discuss Budget
    Planning for the worst case scenario. That's what the San Diego Unified School District will be doing Tuesday, as it looks at making more cuts to an already bare bones budget. Rory Devine reports.

    Governor Jerry Brown has told districts around the state to be optimistic and to plan for the passage of a ballot measure that will raise money for schools.

    But San Diego Unified is not counting on that or the concessions from unions.

    SDUSD Approves Budget Plan

    [DGO] SDUSD Approves Budget Plan
    San Diego Unified School District approved a plan for a balanced budget that must be sent to the County Office of Education by Thursday. Rory Devine reports.

    The district will simply brace for the worst and lay out plans to cut more than 1,000 positions, including more than 800 teachers.

    Behind the scenes, union concessions are likely. All but the teacher’s union have agreed to negotiate changes to their contracts to help keep the district solvent.

    Teachers have said they are willing to negotiate but not until the district knows how much money it will receive from the state.

    If the ballot measure does not pass, California schools face almost $5 billion in cuts.