Woman With Swine Flu Dies

The young woman had no underlying health problems.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
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    Empty vials of H1N1 vaccine sit on a table during a drive thru H1N1 vaccination clinic at Doctor's Medical Center November 5, 2009 in San Pablo, California. California public health officials say that shortages of the H1N1 vaccinations may make it imopssible to vaccinate people at risk of contracting the H1N1 flu. County health agencies across California have received less than 45% of the vaccines ordered.

    A woman who tested positive for H1N1 and had no underlying medical conditions has died, according to county officials.

    The County Health Department reported Wednesday that the 29-year-old woman died While H1N1 has been determined as the cause of death.

    Her death brings the total number of people who tested positive for swine flu and died locally to 62. Fifty-five of those were local residents.

    The H1N1 vaccine is now available to everyone in the county. Residents are encouraged to contact their doctor.

    While H1N1 has spread rapidly over the past eight months, there's a good chance you wouldn't catch it from a family member. New research shows that more than 70 percent of people living in the same house with an infected patient did not get sick. 

    Researchers in London studied more than 200 swine flu patients from the beginning of the outbreak through June. Children in a house were twice as likely to develop the virus, compared to adults in the home. Still, researchers say this shows transmission of H1N1 is actually lower than in past pandemics.