Comey Resists Closed-Door Congress Interview on FBI Actions - NBC 7 San Diego

Comey Resists Closed-Door Congress Interview on FBI Actions

The House Judiciary Committee chairman, Rep. Bob Goodlatte of Virginia, subpoenaed Comey as part of an investigation into FBI decisions made during the 2016 election

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    Comey Resists Closed-Door Congress Interview on FBI Actions
    Greg Allen/Invision/AP, File
    This April 17, 2018, file photo shows former FBI director James Comey in New York.

    What to Know

    • The House Judiciary Committee chairman subpoenaed James Comey in an investigation into FBI decisions made during the 2016 election

    • The former FBI chief's lawyer said Comey "will resist in court this abuse of process"

    • Comey said he won't appear before a congressional committee Dec. 3 unless that happens publicly

    Former FBI chief James Comey said Thursday he will resist a subpoena to appear before a congressional committee Dec. 3 unless that happens publicly because House Republicans will distort anything he says behind closed doors.

    "I'm still happy to sit in the light and answer all questions," he tweeted.

    The House Judiciary Committee chairman, Rep. Bob Goodlatte of Virginia, subpoenaed Comey as part of an investigation into FBI decisions made during the 2016 election, when Democrat Hillary Clinton was cleared in a probe into her email use and agents opened an investigation into Donald Trump's campaign and Russia.

    Some Republicans have argued that Justice officials were conspiring against Trump's election when Comey ran the bureau and they have interviewed multiple current and former Justice officials behind closed doors in an effort to prove their point. Democrats say Republicans are trying to discredit special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation before they lose control of the House in January.

    Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    [NATL] Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of “The Case for Reparations,” testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee during a hearing on whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves. 

    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)

    Comey, who was fired by Trump, tweeted of House Republicans: "I've seen enough of their selective leaking and distortion. Let's have a hearing and invite everyone to see."

    His lawyer, David Kelley, said in a statement that Comey "will resist in court this abuse of process."