It's Hard to Predict When the United States' Active Volcanoes Will Erupt: Experts - NBC 7 San Diego
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It's Hard to Predict When the United States' Active Volcanoes Will Erupt: Experts

"It's really difficult to predict, because those volcanoes are relatively quiet until they start to activate an eruption," one expert said

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    U.S. Geological Survey via AP
    This Wednesday, May 16, 2018, image provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows lava spattering from an area between active Fissures 16 and 20 photographed at 8:20 a.m. HST, on the lower east rift of the Kilauea volcano, near Pahoa, Hawaii.

    The United States has more than 160 active volcanoes, but experts say it's hard to tell whether any will erupt soon, like Kilauea did in Hawaii, NBC News reported. 

    Among these volcanoes are Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens and Yellowstone. Kilauea is considered one of the most active volcanoes, as it has been erupting constantly since 1983. But as one expert pointed out, the time scale of eruption is long, and in some cases, that means centuries, or even thousands of years, can pass between eruptions for many volcanoes. 

    "It's really difficult to predict, because those volcanoes are relatively quiet until they start to activate an eruption," said Ben Edwards, a volcanologist and professor of earth sciences at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania.


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    (Published Friday, Nov. 16, 2018)