Private Investigator Hired for Missing Nursing Student

Family of Michelle Le is seeking evidence and information regarding her disappearance.

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Michelle Le went missing on May 27.

    The San Diego family of a missing woman in the Bay Area has hired a private investigator to further develop the case.

    Michelle Le, a 26-year-old graduate of Mt. Carmel High, has been missing for nearly a month. She was last seen on the evening of May 27 when took a break from nursing class at Kaiser Hospital in Hayward.

    Private investigating firm The Framé Group is working in independently of the Hayward Police Department and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, which are also involved in the case.

    However, the ultimate goal of private investigator Michael Framé is to find Le, according to her cousin Krystine Dinh. Framé sent out a letter asking the public to offer any information without having to worry about the fear of reprisal.

    “We understand that witnesses at times are reluctant to come forward or contact law enforcement for a variety of reasons,” he wrote Monday.

    He is offering assistance to anyone with information about Le’s disappearance.
    Dinh said the family is determined to get her home and is using all the resources available to organize a plan.

    “We’re not backing down or giving up,” Dinh said.

    She said the family wanted to hire a private investigator in order to find additional evidence.

    “Now that the case is classified as homicide there’s only so much we can do,” Dinh said.

    Hayward PD recently classified the case as a homicide based on evidence that has not been publicly revealed.

    “To us, if you can’t provide any evidence that she’s not alive, it’s not homicide,” Dinh said. “In our perspective there are so many reasons as to why a case can be classified as homicide.”

    The Le family is eager to find Michelle, who serves as a role model for her large extended family, according to Dinh. The reason Le wanted to study medicine and become a nurse was to serve a tribute to her mother, who died of breast cancer when she was younger.

    “We’re staying positive, focused and determined,” Dinh said. “We’re fighting for her. It’s not over until it’s over.”