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We Have Seen "The Future," And It Is Good

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Sundance alum Miranda July made a long overdue return to the silver screen, as her new film, "The Future," was shown as part of the Sundance Premieres program.

    Sundance director John Cooper was on hand at the cavernous Eccles Theater to introduce "The Future," saying he couldn't think of a more perfect film" to open the Premieres section, calling July "one of the great poets of our time."

    July came out to a thunderous applause, one that made her appear even more uncomfortable than she normally does. At issue were the constant reminders over the past three months that her film would debut in front of 1,200 people.

    "I've been carrying you around--all of you--since November."

    "The Future" is a modern fairy tale set in Los Angeles, focusing on a couple, played by July and Hamish Linklater, who are forced to confront their own mortality and the direction of their lives when they agree to adopt a sick cat they've rescued. Suddenly, they realize the clock is ticking, and vow to quit their jobs and focus on things that are important to them.Needless to say, things go terribly wrong.

    Like her previous film, "Me and You and Everyone We Know," her latest effort is moody, off-kilter, hilarious, sweet and thoughtful. It's also a bit too absurd at times, and not all of her choices pay off, but at least she's trying, and her success rate is higher than a lot of filmmakers who play it safe.

     

    "The Future" is one of the Sundance Premieres