Clippers' Black History Ad Causes Controversy

Controversy is Swirling Around Clippers Owner Donald Sterling Again. At the Center of This Current Storm is an Ad Just Released. It was Supposed to Celebrate Black History Month, but Instead has Offended Many

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK

    For the past few weeks the LA Clippers have been making headlines for playing basketball, but now owner Donald Sterling is now on the defensive.

    In a new advertisement the Clipper announced they're honored to celebrate Black History Month at Wednesday night's game.

    One problem.

    Black History Month was back in February.

    "Donald Sterling hasn't had the greatest track record when it comes to dealing with race matters," states Earl Ofari Hutchinson, President of the LA Urban Roundtable.

    This is just another example of the Clipper's owner's insensitivity, according to Hutchinson, but Hutchinson says he can't completely cast castigate Donald Sterling for this blunder.

    "At least he did bring up Black History Month. He could have ignored it completely, but he did, so credit is given there," according to Earl Ofari Hutchinson, President of the LA Urban Roundtable.

    Some Clipper fans don't like the ad.

    "I think they should have definitely did it in February. This shows some sort of disrespect in my opinion," states Gabrielle Rodriguez, a Clipper fan.

    But it's not just the celebration in the wrong month that's got people talking. It's the celebration itself.

    The team honors Black History Month by giving 1,000 free tickets to "underprivileged kids."

    "There's all kinds of African Americans, and I think that sending that message, is kind of just saying that it correlates with African Americans being low income, and that's just not right," states Gabrielle Rodriguez, a Clipper fan.

    "Overall, with this latest, getting Black History Month wrong, namely in the wrong month, at the wrong time, and celebrating it in the wrong way, that tells me Donald Sterling still has not got the message," states Earl Ofari Hutchinson, President of the LA Urban Roundtable.