Migrant Child Dies in US Custody; 4th Since December - NBC 7 San Diego

Migrant Child Dies in US Custody; 4th Since December

The boy remained hospitalized for about a month before dying Tuesday

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    Migrant Child Dies in US Custody; 4th Since December
    AP
    FILE - In this March 2, 2019 file photo, a razor-wire-covered border wall separates the United States, at left, from Mexico east of Nogales, Ariz.

    A Guatemalan official says a 2½-year-old migrant child has died after crossing the border, becoming the fourth minor known to have died after being detained by the Border Patrol since December.

    Tekandi Paniagua, the consul for Guatemala in Del Rio, Texas, said Wednesday that the boy had entered the United States with his parent at El Paso, Texas, in early April. Paniagua said the boy had a high fever and difficulty breathing, and authorities took him to a children's hospital where he was diagnosed with pneumonia.

    The boy remained hospitalized for about a month before dying Tuesday. The Washington Post first reported his death.

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection didn't respond to a request for comment Wednesday.

    Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    [NATL] Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of “The Case for Reparations,” testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee during a hearing on whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves. 

    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)

    Advocates have long questioned the Border Patrol's ability to care for the thousands of parents and children in its custody. The agency says it's overwhelmed by the surge of migrant families crossing the U.S.-Mexico border.