Viewer Fire Photos: Wildfires Burn North of LA

Check out user-submitted images from fires in the Southland.

48 photos
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L. C. Strudwick-Turner
Pictures taken from window seat of flight into LAX Sunday (8/30/09) afternoon.
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L. C. Strudwick-Turner
Pictures taken from window seat of flight into LAX Sunday (8/30/09) afternoon.
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Lindsay
View of smoke from Venice Pier on Saturday, August 29 2009
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Marc Wood
Foscheck is dropped on a fire in the mountains above JPL on Friday.
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Pictures taken from Sunland on Mather Ave Brentin powelsn>n> 818-640-7567n>n>n>n>n>n>n>n>n>n>n>n>n>n>n>n>n>n>n>n>n>n> Sent from iPhonen>
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Catherine Paez
I just flew into LA today around 12:45 PM & took out my iPhone & snapped a few photos. The sequence of photos is quite dramatic but because of your 1 photo limit I'm only sending the last photo showing downtown LA in the forefront. If you want all of them just let me know.
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Ryan Albertson
We drove to Acton and found a great spot to stop and take photos, right across the street from a fire station!
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Kerry Smith, NBC 5 News
from Universal, 2 pm Saturday
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Dawn Kimball
Looking south east from just north of Vasquez Rocks in Agua Dulce. Saturday August 29, 2009 2:00PM
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Our heros on their way to protect ActonnPhotos taken by Sylvia Premer/Lanaster
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Charles Hansen
Taken from Hwy 14 looking toward Littlerock @ 5:30am Sunday
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Helen Law
view from plane at 3:15pm on Sunday, August 30th
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Tommy
Hard to enjoy the pool knowing so many are homeless not far away. View from North Hollywood high-rise.
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Getty Images
Taken at the back of KFC - Foothill Blvd. La Crescenta
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Brett Harvey
Looking north from Crescenta Valley High School softball field in La Crescenta.
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Getty Images
Smoke from fire close to Tujunga Fire.
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Photos taken by Sylvia Premer/Lancaster at Odett Point, south of Palmdale
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Jenia Hauser
Residents move out, firefighters move in. Saturday, Aug 29
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Photos taken by Sylvia Premer/Lancaster at Odett Point, south of Palmdale
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Gabrielle
This was Big Tujunga Canyon Rd at the Big Tujung Fire Station this afternoon right before it was engulfed.
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Ozryel Flannigan
Photo from VONS parking lot on Foothill Blvd in La Crescenta CA
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Doug Wynn
Taken About 01:30 Aug 30th 2009 From Foothill Blvd. @ Bob Smith Toyota looking towards the heights by WY6NN
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Samantha Pidkowicz
Picture taken before I left for work at 4 pm in Acton
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Raf Barsamian
Alta Dena on Ocean View
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The smoke plumes are estimated to be between 20,000 - 25,000 feet, about 2/3 as tall as the Hiroshima mushroom cloud. It's almost hypnotic, watching it boil and churn all day. Last night, I could clearly see the flames (sorry, they don't photograph well from this distance) and flare-ups climbing the slopes and expanding east and west. Images 8-29-2, 8-29-6, and VierwFromMyOffice-1 show both Tujunga (left) and Station (right) fires. A third fire, imbetween them, is presumably the western arm of the Station fire. The whitecaps in some images appear to be condensing water vapor instead of smoke, similar to a billowing cumulous cloud, caused by the superheated updrafts. I've seen similar caps on mushroom clouds and volcanic plumes. I would speculate that what little moisture there is in the air and burning fuel in the firestorm, is being vaporized, carried aloft, and somehow concentrated enough to form the cloudtop. It's not clear why it's separating from the smoke, perhaps it's lighter. If you have any atmospheric experts on tap, I'd be interested in a thorough description of the physics involved. Technical notes: I live in The Bryson, a 96-year-old historic high- rise on Wilshire Blvd in Lafayette Park area. The irregularities visible in some foreground buildings are due to the antique glass in my windows. Images have been digitally enhanced to improve visibility and contrast in the clouds.
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Darlene Clearwater
Taken at the Parsons East Bldg parking structure in Pasadena, on Friday, 8/28 at 12:45pm.
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Katie Gunning
View from Lake Avenue & 210 Freeway in Pasadena. Lake Avenue Congregational in foreground
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Derrick Hampton
This is the view from Loma Alta Drive in Altadena
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Darlene Clearwater
Taken at the corner of Fair Oaks Ave and Union in Pasadena on Friday, 8/28 at 11:35am.
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Photo of La Canada-Flintridge Fire from sixth floor of bldg 321 on the NASA/JPL Campus (around 12pm, 8/28/09).
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Melissa Riche
At midday today, August 29 - we looked directly east to the La Canada fire from Culver City Park, we were in awe of all the smoke. And I thought of how brave and dedicated all those firemen are.
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The smoke plumes are estimated to be between 20,000 - 25,000 feet, about 2/3 as tall as the Hiroshima mushroom cloud. It's almost hypnotic, watching it boil and churn all day. Last night, I could clearly see the flames (sorry, they don't photograph well from this distance) and flare-ups climbing the slopes and expanding east and west. Images 8-29-2, 8-29-6, and VierwFromMyOffice-1 show both Tujunga (left) and Station (right) fires. A third fire, imbetween them, is presumably the western arm of the Station fire. The whitecaps in some images appear to be condensing water vapor instead of smoke, similar to a billowing cumulous cloud, caused by the superheated updrafts. I've seen similar caps on mushroom clouds and volcanic plumes. I would speculate that what little moisture there is in the air and burning fuel in the firestorm, is being vaporized, carried aloft, and somehow concentrated enough to form the cloudtop. It's not clear why it's separating from the smoke, perhaps it's lighter. If you have any atmospheric experts on tap, I'd be interested in a thorough description of the physics involved. Technical notes: I live in The Bryson, a 96-year-old historic high- rise on Wilshire Blvd in Lafayette Park area. The irregularities visible in some foreground buildings are due to the antique glass in my windows. Images have been digitally enhanced to improve visibility and contrast in the clouds.
33/48
The smoke plumes are estimated to be between 20,000 - 25,000 feet, about 2/3 as tall as the Hiroshima mushroom cloud. It's almost hypnotic, watching it boil and churn all day. Last night, I could clearly see the flames (sorry, they don't photograph well from this distance) and flare-ups climbing the slopes and expanding east and west. Images 8-29-2, 8-29-6, and VierwFromMyOffice-1 show both Tujunga (left) and Station (right) fires. A third fire, imbetween them, is presumably the western arm of the Station fire. The whitecaps in some images appear to be condensing water vapor instead of smoke, similar to a billowing cumulous cloud, caused by the superheated updrafts. I've seen similar caps on mushroom clouds and volcanic plumes. I would speculate that what little moisture there is in the air and burning fuel in the firestorm, is being vaporized, carried aloft, and somehow concentrated enough to form the cloudtop. It's not clear why it's separating from the smoke, perhaps it's lighter. If you have any atmospheric experts on tap, I'd be interested in a thorough description of the physics involved. Technical notes: I live in The Bryson, a 96-year-old historic high- rise on Wilshire Blvd in Lafayette Park area. The irregularities visible in some foreground buildings are due to the antique glass in my windows. Images have been digitally enhanced to improve visibility and contrast in the clouds.
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Dan Koval
Jacks
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The smoke plumes are estimated to be between 20,000 - 25,000 feet, about 2/3 as tall as the Hiroshima mushroom cloud. It's almost hypnotic, watching it boil and churn all day. Last night, I could clearly see the flames (sorry, they don't photograph well from this distance) and flare-ups climbing the slopes and expanding east and west. Images 8-29-2, 8-29-6, and VierwFromMyOffice-1 show both Tujunga (left) and Station (right) fires. A third fire, imbetween them, is presumably the western arm of the Station fire. The whitecaps in some images appear to be condensing water vapor instead of smoke, similar to a billowing cumulous cloud, caused by the superheated updrafts. I've seen similar caps on mushroom clouds and volcanic plumes. I would speculate that what little moisture there is in the air and burning fuel in the firestorm, is being vaporized, carried aloft, and somehow concentrated enough to form the cloudtop. It's not clear why it's separating from the smoke, perhaps it's lighter. If you have any atmospheric experts on tap, I'd be interested in a thorough description of the physics involved. Technical notes: I live in The Bryson, a 96-year-old historic high- rise on Wilshire Blvd in Lafayette Park area. The irregularities visible in some foreground buildings are due to the antique glass in my windows. Images have been digitally enhanced to improve visibility and contrast in the clouds.
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AJ Marik
Shot this photo while traveling northbound on the Glendale (2) Freeway at 7:10pm, August 29, 2009. Massive smoke, some flames, great contrast in the setting sun.
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Jenia Hauser
Station Fire. Over La Canada. Saturday, Aug 29
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Brentin powels 818-640-7567
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Don Farnsworth
As the fire burns near Acton on 08/30/09, driven by high winds, smoke covers a late afternoon northeast Lancaster sky.
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Charles Hansen
Taken from my garage looking toward Acton Sunday 11:20am
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Brentin powels 818-640-7567
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Nancy Manley
Erikson Aircrane water refilling La Crescenta
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Joyce Sharp
Smoke from Station fire, as seen from Balboa and Nordhoff on Sat.,8-29-09. The billowing smoke looked like a mean and angry face!
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Evi Ace Chang
Good Shot!
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Greg Armijo
view of smoke from Team Chevrolet in Pasadena.
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Greg Armijo
another view of smoke from Pasadena
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K. Sissons
Erickson Sky Crane dropping water on Yucaipa "Pendleton Fire" 8-31-09
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Heidi Hause
This photo was taken today, Monday, August 31, 2009 at 4:35PM. Location is just east of Boston Avenue and Markridge.
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