It Wasn’t a Fluke — Scientists See Black Holes Collide Again

The phenomenon backs up Einstein's prediction about gravitational waves

Scientists have seen two black holes crash into each other and merge for the second time, proving Albert Einstein was right and showing the first observation was no fluke, NBC News reports.

Ultra-sensitive instruments called the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory detected the ripple in gravitational waves that came across space and time to Earth last December, the team reported Wednesday.

Last February's announcement that the observatory had detected gravitational waves shook the science world and provided hard evidence to back up Einstein's prediction about gravitational waves in his General Theory of Relativity.

"We can now demonstrate with complete confidence that it wasn't a fluke because we saw something again," said Richard O'Shaughnessy, a team member from the Rochester Institute of Technology.

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