No Access to R Kelly's Chicago Studio Overnight, Judge Rules - NBC 7 San Diego
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No Access to R Kelly's Chicago Studio Overnight, Judge Rules

While the judge’s ruling does give Kelly expanded use of the building, her primary concern remains that she doesn’t want anybody sleeping in this building or partying late into the night.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    R. Kelly Still Limited in Studio Usage After Court Ruling

    Attorneys for R. Kelly were back in court Friday, asking a judge to give him more access to his rented studio space on the near west side. nBC 5's Charlie Wojciechowski has the details. 

    (Published Friday, Feb. 8, 2019)

    There will be no one staying or working overnight in R. Kelly's recording studio on North Justine Street.

    That ruling was handed down Friday in housing court, rejecting Kelly’s attorney's assertions that the singer needed 24-hour access to the unpermitted recording studio there.

    "You can't put a schedule on when a moment of beautiful music comes into your soul," Melvin Simms III, Kelly's attorney, said.

    The two page ruling did grant additional access, allowing Kelly to work on the first floor between the hours of 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. but prohibited any use of the second floor.

    "The city brought concerns before the court because we believe that the building was not safe for occupancy," said the city's corporation counsel Kimberly Roberts. "I believe the judge appreciated those concerns and she restricted all residency on the second floor, she restricted access so people cant even be up there."

    In January, city inspectors found a number of deficiencies at the warehouse space Kelly rents on the Near West Side.

    They also found a bed, clothing and other evidence that the building was being used as a residence something Kelly's attorneys deny.

    "That bedding has been removed," Simms said. "It is no longer used as a sleeping area."

    While the judge’s ruling does give Kelly expanded use of the building, her primary concern remains that she doesn’t want anybody sleeping in this building or partying late into the night.

    Kelly's team, including his personal attorney Brian Nix, said they have hired an architect who will draw up a plan for repairs to the building, including code violations that could go back decades.

    "We got the best architect that we could find and we are going to be working with him going forward to assess all options at the building," Simms said.

    Roberts added "they are tasked with having an architect supply all the proper plans and get permits from the city--the architect is going to be very busy."