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Photos: A Look at a California Condor Chick Hatching in the Wild

A California condor is on the verge of hatching from its egg nestled in a cliffside cave at the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge in Ventura County.

8 photos
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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Eggs are candled to study the growth and development of an embryo inside of an egg. This egg was incubated at Los Angeles Zoo and placed in a wild California condor nest at Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge in Ventura County to hatch. A live stream camera has been set up inside the nest to give viewers an intimate look at the hatching.
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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
The egg that hatched at Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge this April was produced as part of the captive breeding program at Los Angeles Zoo. The incubation period for condor eggs is around 56 days.
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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
This image is from a wild California condor nest at Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge. This egg went missing, likely predated, the evening of March 20, and was replaced with a captive-bred egg from Los Angeles Zoo.
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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
An X-ray view of California condor egg No. 216.
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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
The egg is examined at the Los Angeles Zoo.
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The pipped egg was handed off Eddie Owen with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service by caretakers at the Los Angeles Zoo to be transfered to the California condor nest at Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge.
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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Wildlife biologist Eddie Owen with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service prepares to insert the egg into the cliffside nest at Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge in Ventura County.
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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologist Eddie Owens places pipped egg from LA Zoo into wild California condor nest. The captive bred egg is replacing the wild laid egg that went missing in March.
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