Chicago Principal Knocked Out Breaking Up Fight Between Kids - NBC 7 San Diego
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Chicago Principal Knocked Out Breaking Up Fight Between Kids

Family members said Conley was struck, fell and hit her head during the altercation

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    NEWSLETTERS

    CPS Principal Hurt Trying to Break Up Fight at Elementary School

    A principal at a Chicago Public School was hospitalized after she was injured trying to break up a fight between students at her elementary school. Michelle Relerford reports. (Published Tuesday, May 10, 2016)

    A Chicago elementary school principal was hospitalized after she was injured trying to break up a fight between students.

    Chinyere Okafor-Conley was knocked unconscious Monday afternoon while attempting to intervene during an altercation between two students at Jensen Elementary School on Chicago’s West Side, Chicago Public Schools said in a statement.

    Family members and authorities said Conley was struck during the fight, fell and hit her head. She was rushed to Mount Sinai Hospital for treatment.

    Family members said she was awake and responding Tuesday, but still undergoing tests.

    "She’s doing a lot better than she was yesterday," said Conley’s brother, Chukwudi Okafor.

    Police said the fight involved two teens, both of whom were taken into custody. A 13-year-old girl was charged with misdemeanor battery and misdemeanor reckless conduct and a 14-year-old was charged with misdemanor reckless conduct. 

    Their names were not released because of their age. 

    A letter was sent home to parents following the incident, but further details on the fight weren’t immediately released.

    "CPS’ crisis support teams were on site at Jensen Elementary on Monday, and will offer support to students and staff again today," CPS said in a statement. "Our thoughts are with the principal for a full recovery."

    The Chicago Teachers Union said schools need resources for restorative justice programs.

    "It's a way to establish relationships, sustain those relationships and, when necessary, repair them, and so I think that this could have been more of a preventative measure to take," said Walter Taylor, a professional development facilitator with the union.