NYPD's Bratton: Back Turns to Mayor Inappropriate - NBC 7 San Diego
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NYPD's Bratton: Back Turns to Mayor Inappropriate

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Bratton: Rift with Mayor will 'Go on For a While'

    NYPD Commissioner William Bratton said it was "very inappropriate'' for police officers to turn their backs to video screens showing Mayor Bill de Blasio speaking at an officer's funeral Saturday.

    "I certainly don't support that action," he said on CBS' "Face the Nation" on Sunday. "That funeral was held to honor officer Ramos. And to bring politics, to bring issues into that event, I think, was very inappropriate."

    Bratton defended de Blasio, saying the mayor is "totally supportive'' of officers.

    His appearance came a day after hundreds of police officers -- some from across the country -- turned their backs as de Blasio spoke at the funeral of officer Rafael Ramos, who was posthumously promoted to detective.

    Ramos and his partner were shot and killed a week ago in a brazen daylight attack on their patrol car. The mayor has been portrayed by some critics as too supportive of police protesters.

    The mayor made no public appearances Sunday, but is scheduled to deliver remarks Monday morning at an NYPD graduation ceremony in Madison Square Garden.

    Bratton also spoke on NBC's "Meet The Press'' Sunday, saying the rift between some in the NYPD and de Blasio will not be easily solved.

    "I think it's probably a rift that is going to go on for a while longer," Bratton said. "However, we will be making efforts to sit down and talk with the union leaders in particular to deal with their issues.

    "The issues go far beyond race relations in this city," he told host Chuck Todd, citing labor disputes between the NYPD and the city.

    The five city police unions are scheduled to meet with Bratton this week.

    He also discussed the need to recognize the concerns and fears of the African-American community, calling it their "reality."

    "In policing that sometimes it's difficult to see those [concerns]. And I made comments yesterday in my eulogy about seeing each other to understand," Bratton said. "Right, when I say 'see each other,' that means to not look past each other, but to really see what is motivating what we're experiencing."