Baby Dies After Being Left in Car in Florida - NBC 7 San Diego
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Baby Dies After Being Left in Car in Florida

The temperature outside ranged from the mid- to upper-80s on Monday afternoon

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Investigation Continues Into Hialeah Baby Death in Car

    An 11-month-old girl died after she was left inside her parents' parked car Monday in South Florida, possibly for hours, according to police. NBC 6's Jamie Guirola reports. (Published Tuesday, May 24, 2016)

    An 11-month-old girl died after she was left inside her parents' parked car Monday in South Florida, possibly for hours, according to police.

    Emergency responders were called to the 3500 block of West 86th Terrace in Hialeah around 4:10 p.m. The baby was found unconscious and taken to Palmetto General Hospital, where she was pronounced dead. 

    Police said the baby had been left inside her parents' parked vehicle with the engine turned off. It's not clear how long she was there, but police said it may have been a few hours. The child's name has not been released.

    The temperature outside climbed into the upper 80s on Monday afternoon, according to the National Weather Service.

    "In 10 to 15 minutes, a temperature of a car that's parked with the engine not running could go from 80 degrees to 130 degrees," explained a member of the fire rescue team.

    Authorities have not taken anyone into custody or filed charges in connection with the case. Police are working with the Miami-Dade state attorney's office to investigate.

    Hialeah Police also issued the following statement: "We are aware of the public interest and multiple information requests for this case. However, we will not be releasing any further information at this time while the case remains open and active. This is a very significant incident and an equally important investigation. We do not wish to comprise the integrity of the investigation or release incomplete information until the investigation is finalized."

    According to HeatStroke.org, the child is the first to die in a vehicle in Florida this year and the eighth nationwide.

    Janette Fennell, president and founder of Kids and Cars, a nonprofit organization focused on improving child safety around cars, recommends the following tips to parents:

    1. Look before you lock. Open the back door and look in the back seat to make sure everyone is out of the car (even if you think there is no one back there).
    2. Keep something you need in the back seat. Put your cellphone, briefcase, computer, lunch, ID badge, left shoe or anything essential to your daily routine next your child.
    3. Travel with a furry companion. Keep a stuffed animal in the car seat. When a baby is in the seat, the stuffed animal rides shotgun. The furry passenger serves as a reminder that baby's in the back.
    4. Always lock the doors. Even if the car is in the garage, keep the doors locked to prevent curious children from getting into the car.
    5. Put the keys and fobs away. Kids might want to play with keys and be able to get into the car without parents knowledge.
    6. Have a plan with child-care provider. If your child does not show up to daycare or school without prior notice, someone should call to locate child.
    7. If you see something, do something. If you see a child alone in a car, do not hesitate to call 911.