Rep Levin Pays Tribute to Encinitas Bluff Collapse Victims on House Floor - NBC 7 San Diego

Rep Levin Pays Tribute to Encinitas Bluff Collapse Victims on House Floor

Three people were killed and two others were injured when a cliff came crashing down Friday afternoon at Grandview Beach in Leucadia, California, in San Diego’s North County

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Cliff Collapse Victims Are From The Same Family

    The three victims killed when a cliff collapsed on a beach in Leucadia, California, Friday were related: a daughter, mother, and aunt. NBC 7's Erika Cervantes has more. (Published Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019)

    Three family members killed when an Encinitas cliff collapsed on top of them during a beach day last month were remembered Wednesday on the House floor. 

    Rep. Mike Levin (CA-49) paid tribute to the three women -- Annie Clave, 35, Julie Davis, 65, and Elizabeth Cox -- who were crushed on Aug. 2 while celebrating the tough battle Cox had fought against breast cancer at the North County beach. 

    "There is a lot that I would like to say about the government’s responsibility to help prevent similar tragedies in the future but instead I want to use this moment to recognize the extraordinary light that all three of these women brought into this world," Levin said. 

    Levin told the U.S. House of Representatives he stands with Julie Davis' husband, Dr. Pat Davis, who has pushed the local, state and federal leaders to make changes that would prevent bluff collapses in the future.

    He wrote a letter to the federal government signed by both California senators asking for $700,000 to improve bluff safety and replenish sand in Encinitas and Solana Beach.

    Just weeks after tragedy struck his family, Pat Davis stood in front of the Encinitas City Council and urged the council to work with the California Coastal Commission to build protective walls, replenish sand or make certain beaches off limits. 

    He said it was only a matter of when, not if, another tragedy would strike. 

    Clave was remembered by family for her joyous and fun personality. Davis was called an "incredible grandmother."

    Many of Julie Davis' grandchildren were in the impact zone when the 30-foot-wide and 25-foot-deep bluff fell. The family said they were grateful none were injured but two other people were. 

    The city said they have to work with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Coastal Commission, the Surfrider Foundation and other agencies to get the job done. City Councilmember Tony Kranz said there is a long road ahead for bluff repairs. 

    Local geologist Pat Abbot told NBC 7 that sand along the bluffs in North County will never stop falling, and said that there are deeper cracks in the faces of the bluffs that could lead to larger collapses.

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