Kodak Black

Rapper Kodak Black’s Family Tries to Sue Federal Prison, Fears for Son’s Life

In a lengthy Instagram post, the Florida native alleged that a Bureau of Prisons supervisor played a role in him being laced, bruised and brutally beaten.

NBCUniversal, Inc.

The family of rapper Kodak Black is planning to sue a federal Department of Justice agency after the treatment their son said he and other inmates received in a Florida federal prison.

In a lengthy Instagram post, the Florida native alleged that a Bureau of Prisons supervisor played a role in him being laced, bruised and brutally beaten. He also says he was denied a visit from his mother on December 23.

"They don’t let me see him. They don’t want my son happy, that’s why they don’t let me see him," Black's mother, Marlene Simmons, says.

Black's post went on to mention how an inmate named "Pete" took his own life due to the treatment he received in solitary confinement.

"As Pete's constant cries for help feel on deaf ears, he decided to take himself out of his misery," Black wrote.

The rapper was arrested in May on federal weapons charges just before a scheduled performance at South Florida's Rolling Loud music festival.

Black pleaded guilty in a Miami federal court. Prosecutors charged him with crimes including falsifying information on federal forms to buy four firearms from a Miami-area gun shop on two separate occasions.

Black served four months of a four-year sentence at the federal prison in Miami before an altercation at the facility had him moved to a prison in Southwest Miami-Dade.

His lawyers say they plan on suing the Bureau of Prisons for violating Black's, and other inmates, civil rights. They added that the correctional officers working in the prisons are exposed to the same danger.

"When you have these instances of under funding and understaffed, well that makes prison’s dangerous. So, if other inmates attack [Simmons'] son, who is a well known person, there are supposed to be guards who can handle a crisis situation," Black's lawyer, Benjamin Crump, says.

Documents obtained by NBC 6 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration show the facility Black was moved to in Southwest Miami-Dade was cited for unsafe or unhealthy working conditions.

Lawyers say they cannot sue just yet because they must first speak with Black. They say when they went to visit him at the Southwest Miami-Dade prison, he was gone.

Prison workers say he was on a bus to Kentucky.

However, the prison's online database says he is still in the facility.

In an email, The Bureau of Prisons said they would not comment on pending litigation.

Contact Us