State Warns of Excessive Heat Headed Our Way | NBC 7 San Diego

State Warns of Excessive Heat Headed Our Way

Heat records will likely be broken in San Diego county mountains and deserts

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Jodi Kodesh's Friday Morning Forecast for June 3, 2016 (Published Friday, June 3, 2016)

    A heatwave will bring unusually high temperatures to San Diego County this weekend.

    The National Weather Service has issued excessive heat warnings for multiple areas throughout the state that will last through Sunday.

    Triple-digit temperatures were expected in the deserts east of San Diego with temperatures in the 90s in the mountain areas.

    “We’re seeing temperatures of 110 to 116 in our desert cities. That is dangerous heat to be outside in so you want to limit your outside activity,” NBC 7’s Meteorologist Jodi Kodesh said.

    Kodesh said the hottest days will be Friday and Saturday.

    Heat records will likely be broken in San Diego county mountains and deserts.

    Borrego Springs is forecast to reach 116 degrees on Friday. It should break a record of 113 that was set in 2006.

    Palomar Mountain is forecast to reach 92 Friday, possibly breaking the record of 89 degrees that was set in 1970.

    The heat took some people by surprise on Thursday, including a young woman who was hiking with her dog at Iron Mountain.

    "It was a little too hot today, if we would've known we would've came more prepared. With the dog, she kept stopping," the woman told NBC 7.

    Many hikers had expected an overcast day turned back around Thursday, saying they were not prepared for the heat.

    Cal/OSHA has issued a statewide high heat advisory for employers reminding them to protect workers from heat illness and exhaustion.

    “Water, rest, shade and increased vigilance are absolutely essential in high heat conditions,” Cal/OSHA Chief Juliann Sum said in a written news release.

    Under California law, employers with outdoor workers must provide enough fresh water so each employee can drink at least one quart, or four 8-ounce glasses, of water per hour, and encourage them to do so.

    Employers must not only provide access to shade but encourage employees to take a cool-down rest in the shade for at least 5 minutes.

    Online information on the heat illness prevention requirements and training materials can be obtained at Cal/OSHA’s Heat Illness web page or the Water. Rest. Shade. campaign site.

    A Heat Illness Prevention e-tool is also available on Cal/OSHA’s website.