Thieves Strip Million Dollar Mansion

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Someone stripped a million bucks worth of fixtures from a swank 16,000-square-foot foreclosed mansion that was once going to be a rehab wonderland, according to a published report.Someone stripped a million bucks worth of fixtures from a swank 16,000-square-foot foreclosed mansion that was once going to be a rehab wonderland, according to a published report.

    Someone stripped a million bucks worth of fixtures from a swank 16,000-square-foot foreclosed mansion that was once going to be a rehab wonderland, according to a published report.

    So what did the crooks make off with from from what used to be Suzy Brown's quaint little shack in the tiny Olivenhain neighborhood in Encinitas? "Doors, windows, fixtures, toilets, windows, cabinets and appliances," Sheriff's Detective Steven Ashkar told the San Diego Union-Tribune.

    The paper reported that Brown moved out March 22. A Capitol One official filed a police report four days later. Brown said she's clueless about the crime.

    "The whole thing saddens me, but I'm also very frustrated," Brown told the paper, also saying she tried to secure the property.

    Furnishings at the structure included carved teak pillars from Antigua, 300-year-old doors from Egypt and hand-painted tiles that replicate 1920s designs. Everything from lights to the landscape watering system were controlled by a central computer designed by Brown, an electrical engineer.

    The Spanish hacienda-style home on 1.24 acres was funded by Brown and 60 well-heeled investors. Brown had hoped to operate a spiritual healing center for drug addicts, a la Malibu's celeb detox center Promises, which has nurtured tortured geniuses that include Britney Spears and Mel Gibson. The facility was designed to nurture 41 well-heeled souls. It makes one wonder about what might have happened if it was successful. Would it be the end of TMZ?

    Eventually, mind-body health guru Deepak Chopra signed on, too, and it seemed time for serenity now, right? Wrong. The horsy neighbors were in no mood to be enlightened and dubbed the residence the Monster House, and the city's confusing zoning rules gave them ammunition to delay -- and ultimately kill -- Brown's vision.

    Brown told the North County Times she and her unnamed investors spent $13 million on the home.