Organizer of "Revolution 2.0" Wants to Meet Mark Zuckerberg

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Richard Engel
    Protesters hold a sign thanking the youth of Egypt and Facebook Friday.

    The Egyptian revolution was televised thanks in large part to social networking.

    As the president of the Middle Eastern country stepped down on Friday, a 30-year-old Google executive, who became the face of the revolution in the west, dubbed the Egyptian uprising "Revolution 2.0" in an interview with CNN.

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    "This revolution started online, started on Facebook," said Wael Ghonim, the head of marketing of Google Middle East and North Africa.

    The computer engineer, who disappeared for 10 days after sending a mysterious tweet during the middle of protests, said the Egyptian revolution could not have happened without organizing on sites such as Facebook and Twitter.

    He said planning for the uprising began in June 2010 with the launch of a Facebook page.

    "We would post a video and have thousands of shares on Facebook within minutes," he said.

    With the culmination of the organizers' work coming Friday with Hosni Mubarak vacating his presidential seat, Ghonim said he hopes to one day to speak with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

    "I want to meet Mark Zuckerburg one day and thank him actually," he said. "Tell him to call me."

    Ghonim also has some advice for other leaders in the region worried about an uprising in their country.

    "Look to Facebook," he said.

    Ghonim also said he plans on going back to his old job at Google, adding he has no plans to run for political office.