Vin Scully Returns as Dodgers' Announcer for the 2011 Season

Legendary broadcaster could be turning off the mic but not until after 2011

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
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    Fans of the Los Angeles Dodgers can exhale as the uncertaintiy of one area for the boys in blue has been cleared up:  Announcer Vin Scully will return to the booth that is named after him for the 2011 baseball season, according to team officials.

    “I’m just honored and humbled to continue my association with the Dodgers, which has been a major part of my life,” said Scully. 

    Scully has long hinted at retirement after the 2010 season and how he doesn't like how road trips keep him away from his wife Sandra. He now only announces home games and road games against National League West Division and American League West Division opponents.  But Scully agreed to continue on with his current schedule through the 2011 season because his wife gave the final approval. 

     

    “My wife, God bless her, said ‘If you love it, do it.’” said Scully while speaking to reporters at Dodger Stadium before Sunday’s game against the Reds.

    Scully even made a joke about the Dodgers’ latest acquisition. He told reporters he knew for a while he wanted to stay, “But now that they have Rod Barajas, that was the clincher!”

    "I'm as thrilled as our fans that Vin will be returning," said owner Frank  McCourt. "He is not only the greatest broadcaster of all time, but also a  wonderful friend."

    The American Sportscasters Association has named Scully as the greatest sportscaster. A ranking system devised by author Curt Smith for his 2005 book "Voices of the Game" determined that Scully was baseball's greatest announcer, giving him a perfect score of 100, based on such factors as longevity, language, popularity and persona.

    Either on the team or NBC's broadcasts, Scully has called such memorable moments by the Dodgers (or their opponents) as Kirk Gibson's pinch-hit home run in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 1 of the 1988 World Series, Sandy Koufax's perfect game in 1965, New York Yankee pitcher Don Larsen's perfect game against the Dodgers in the 1956 World Series and Hank Aaron's record- setting 715th home run.

    Sleep well fans. The beloved  "Voice of the Dodgers" will return next year leaving only the following uncertainties for Dodgers' fans: Who will be the owners? Will Mannywood relocate? Will Joe Torre continue as manager? Will management pay to bring in some top tier players?