Deadline Looms in San Diego, Chargers Stadium Negotiations - NBC 7 San Diego

San Diego Chargers launch a hurry-up offense to replace the aging Qualcomm Stadium

Deadline Looms in San Diego, Chargers Stadium Negotiations

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Deadline Looms in San Diego, Chargers Stadium Negotiations
    Office of San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer
    The week of the NFL owners' meeting in Chicago, San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer released these images of stadium concepts

    The game clock is about to run out on an important deadline in the negotiations to build a new NFL stadium in the city of San Diego.

    Mayor Kevin Faulconer set a deadline to reach an agreement with the San Diego Chargers by Sept. 11 in order to allow enough time for voters to voice their opinion on the deal.

    However, there have been no new negotiations since city and team officials met in June.

    Faulconer has said any agreement for using public funds to pay to replace the aging Qualcomm Stadium must be presented to taxpayers for approval.

    “Not a dime will be spent on any construction unless voters approve it,” he said last month when he presented a proposed financing plan.

    The mayor and team officials needed to agree to terms by Friday to schedule a Jan. 12, 2016 election.

    The Chargers must file an application for relocation by February 15, 2016.

    A month ago Carmen Policy, the former NFL executive who was hired to help the Chargers and Raiders sell the NFL on their plan to build a joint-use facility in Carson, announced that the Chargers were committed to Los Angeles.

    Earlier this week the Taxpayers Protection Alliance (TPA) released a report suggesting that using public money to finance an NFL facility is a great way to ruin your economy.

    According to the TPA, since 1995 29 of the 31 current NFL stadiums received public money for either construction, renovation or both. The two exceptions are Miami and New Jersey. The TPA says the total price tag for the taxpayers on those 29 stadiums runs $7 billion.