Calif. Lawmakers Sense Gun Control Opportunity

By Judy Lin
|  Thursday, Jan 17, 2013  |  Updated 7:49 AM PDT
View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print
Study: College Students Not Gun Shy

Photos and Videos

Jackie Speier Talks Gun Control

NBC Bay Area's Jodi Hernandez caught up with local congresswoman Jackie Speier, herself a high-profile victim of gun violence, for her reaction to President Barack Obama s new gun control proposals.

President Promises Gun Control

President Obama signs executive orders on gun control, promises to fight for assault weapons ban. Danielle Leigh reports.
More Photos and Videos

 Democratic state lawmakers are sensing an opportunity to pass stricter gun and ammunition laws in California after New York approved the toughest gun-control law in the nation and President Barack Obama proposed the most sweeping attempt to control firearms in nearly two decades.

But the proposals in California, which range from regulating ammunition sales to increasing safety at schools, may not seem so pressing to Gov. Jerry Brown. California has earned a reputation for being tough on guns.

It currently bans the sale of assault rifles and magazines with more than 10 rounds of ammunition. Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg said Wednesday the mass shooting at a Connecticut elementary school should serve as a catalyst for closing loopholes and limiting access to large numbers of bullets even more.

He expects the Democratic-controlled Legislature to strengthen gun control this year but not match New York's law.

"There are too many loopholes in California when it comes to our assault weapons ban,'' he said. Steinberg said he will support proposals intended to make it more difficult to obtain devices that allow the rapid fire of dozens of rounds, and to require the reporting of ammunition purchases. He added the state should take more steps to get weapons out of the hands of felons, mentally ill people and others who cannot legally possess them.

"We're going to make this issue a priority we have to,'' he told reporters in his Capitol office. One person who remains surprisingly reluctant to chime in to the gun control debate is the Democratic governor.

His stance could have implications for any new wave of gun- and ammunition-control proposals. Brown was asked at a recent news conference if he would discuss gun-control proposals in the Legislature.

His response: "No.'' He said he would consider legislation sent his way but noted that California already has strict gun laws and made it clear that he has other priorities. ``I've got stuff on water, on high-speed rail, on weighted student formula.

I mean, you name it, we got it,'' he said. His office said the governor doesn't comment on bills until they reach his desk. When asked to comment on the president's proposal, Brown said he supports federal rules intended to supplement state laws. Several California lawmakers responded to last month's shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., with calls for new laws aimed at increasing safety.

Among them:

  • Democratic Sen. Leland Yee of San Francisco submitted a bill that would close loopholes in the state's ban on assault weapons. SB47 would prohibit the use of so-called bullet buttons and other devices that allow for swift reloading of military-style assault weapons.
  • Yee also is carrying SB108, which would require all guns to be properly stored with a trigger lock or in a lock box when the owner is not present. Currently, the state only requires owners to have a trigger lock or safety lock box but doesn't require the safety device to be used.
  • Democratic Assemblywoman Nancy Skinner of Berkeley introduced AB48, which would regulate ammunition sales by requiring sellers to be licensed and buyers to have and show valid identification, similar to those covering gun sales. The bill, co-authored with Assemblyman Rob Bonta, D-Alameda, also would ban clip kits that can convert guns into assault weapons.
  • Sen. Ted Lieu, a Democrat from Torrance, re-introduced legislation under SB49, a school-protection measure that would require public schools statewide to prepare and update their emergency response plans in case of an attack.
  • Sen. Kevin de Leon, D-Los Angeles, announced plans for legislation that would increase restrictions on purchasing ammunition by requiring buyers to get a permit, undergo a background check and pay a fee. No bill number has been announced yet. Some city leaders are exploring their own measures. For example, Los Angeles City Councilman Paul Krekorian this week introduced a motion to study a possible ban on the possession of high-capacity ammunition magazines within city limits. He referenced the North Hollywood shootout 16 years ago, in which two gunmen with high-powered weapons robbed a bank and overwhelmed responding police officers.

Currently, the state only bans the sale of high-capacity magazines. Krekorian said a ban on the possession of such magazines could improve public safety. While Democratic lawmakers emphasized the ease in buying guns and bullets, Republicans responded to a controversy in upstate New York, in which a suburban newspaper published the addresses of homes with gun permits. They want to protect the privacy of gun owners by prohibiting such information from being disclosed publicly.

Assemblyman Allan Mansoor, R-Costa Mesa, and Assemblyman Dan Logue, R-Linda, are teaming up on AB132, which would ban counties from releasing the phone numbers and addresses of people holding or applying for concealed weapons permits to the public.

The GOP lawmakers say they want the same protection for permit holders as there is for judges and peace officers. Law enforcement would still have access to personal information.

``I am a supporter of the Second Amendment, public safety, and people's privacy,'' Logue said in a statement Wednesday.

``This bill creates a perfect union of responsible gun ownership, protection of people's private information, and allowing public safety officials to have the tools they need to keep the public safe.'' The Republican proposal is unlikely to receive a receptive audience in the Legislature, where Democrats have two-thirds majorities in both houses.

Get the latest headlines sent to your inbox!
View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print
Leave Comments
Follow Us
Sign up to receive news and updates that matter to you.
Send Us Your Story Tips
Check Out