<![CDATA[NBC 7 San Diego - San Diego Politics and Political News]]>Copyright 2016http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/politics http://media.nbcnewyork.com/designimages/KNSD+RSS+Feed+logo+blue.png NBC 7 San Diego http://www.nbcsandiego.comen-usTue, 30 Aug 2016 10:13:54 -0700Tue, 30 Aug 2016 10:13:54 -0700NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[McCain Fights 'Trump-Like' Contender in Senate Primary]]> Tue, 30 Aug 2016 08:19:52 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/AP_16242696225282-mccain.jpg

Incumbent U.S. Sen. John McCain is running for re-nomination in Arizona's primary election Tuesday, and he is expected to defeat his leading opponent, former state senator Kelli Ward. For her part, Ward has adopted a Trump-like style of rhetoric during her campaign, highlighting the scourge of illegal immigration and opposing amnesty measures for the undocumented, NBC News reported.

Trump has endorsed McCain, though earlier this campaign cycle he disregarded the 80-year-old senator's status as a war hero. McCain has also agreed to support Trump's presidential run, even though he came out against the real estate mogul's statements about the parents of a fallen soldier who spoke against Trump at the GOP convention.

An unexpected loss for McCain in the primary would indicate a rising backlash against establishment GOP politicians. McCain is also predicted to defeat the favorite potential Democratic nominee, Ann Kirkpatrick, in a general election, though the Democratic contender is expected to use McCain's endorsement of Trump against him.



Photo Credit: Matt York, AP]]>
<![CDATA[Race Tightens as Trump Chips Away at Clinton's Lead]]> Tue, 30 Aug 2016 04:48:46 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/trump-inmigracion-plan-arizona.jpg

Hillary Clinton's national lead over Donald Trump has narrowed to 6 points, according to the latest NBC NewsSurvey Monkey Tracking Poll. Clinton now has 48 support and Trump 42 percent, according to the poll of registered voters from Aug. 22-28.

Last week Clinton led her rival by 8 points. Trump made inroads in the latest poll with registered Independents, who do not lean toward either party.

Two weeks ago Clinton led Trump by 12 points among the group. This week her lead was down to 4 points. The presidential campaign will enter a final phase after Labor Day with an uptick in advertising, NBC News reported.



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<![CDATA[Abedin to Separate From Weiner]]> Mon, 29 Aug 2016 21:20:44 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/weiner-abedin-split-0829.jpg

Longtime Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin announced Monday that she was separating from her husband, former congressman and onetime New York City mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner.

"After long and painful consideration and work on my marriage, I have made the decision to separate from my husband," Abedin said. "Anthony and I remain devoted to doing what is best for our son, who is the light of our life. During this difficult time, I ask for respect for our privacy."

The announcement by Abedin, who currently serves as the vice chairwoman of Clinton's presidential campaign, comes hours after a New York Post report that Weiner was again sending sexually suggestive messages with at least one woman.

The photos and messages were published in the Post late Sunday and showed shots of Weiner either shirtless or in his underwear. One photo shows a child that the Post reports was his toddler son. NBC 4 New York has not been able to independently confirm the photos.

Weiner told the Post he had been "friends for some time" with the woman and that the conversations were private. He deleted his Twitter account hours after the Post hit newsstands on Monday.

NBC 4 New York has reached out to Weiner for comment. 

Abedin and Weiner have been living separate lives for some time, a close friend of hers told NBC News. 

“This did not happen overnight. This has been brewing,” the friend said. 

Notably, in recent months, Abedin has not been seen wearing a wedding ring. 

A second friend told NBC News that Abedin, who has been in the Hamptons for several days already, will likely lay low and focus on spending time with her family. 

Weiner's congressional career was derailed when he tweeted an explicit photo of himself to a woman in 2011. He initially denied he had posted the image but later admitted to sexting with "about six women over the last three years" before resigning from Congress.

Weiner attempted to re-enter the political fray in 2013 as a candidate for New York City mayor and briefly polled as the leading Democratic candidate that summer. But Weiner revealed that he had sent explicit photos and messages to three more women since 2012, some under the alias "Carlos Danger," and his candidacy floundered. He lost the Democratic mayoral primary with less than 5 percent of the vote.

Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton's opponent in the presidential election, praised Abedin's decision to separation on Monday, calling it a "very wise decision" in a statement to The New York Times

"I only worry for the country in that Hillary Clinton was careless and negligent in allowing Weiner to have such close proximity to highly classified information," the statement reportedly said.



Photo Credit: AP / File]]>
<![CDATA[Trump Ad Credits Tax Plan He Doesn't Support]]> Mon, 29 Aug 2016 09:32:11 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/Trump-AP_778476028199.jpg

Donald Trump's new $10 million TV ad cites two contradictory tax plans — one that Trump has explicitly ruled out and another that he has yet to endorse — raising more questions about what policies the GOP presidential nominee supports, NBC News reports.

Trump's new ad seems generic enough for a Republican politician. In it, he promises lower taxes, more jobs, and growth for small businesses.

But an examination of the fine print supporting the claims provides confusion, not clarity. The ad cites four claims, two from a House Republican proposal similar to one he announced, two from his old tax plan from last year, which had drastically different rates.

So does Trump support the House Republican plan? Does he support his old plan? A spokesman for Trump did not immediately respond to a request for comment.



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<![CDATA[Trump Could Win Big Even If He Loses Election]]> Sun, 28 Aug 2016 11:39:24 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/trump-immigration.jpg

With recent polls showing Hillary Clinton maintaining a sizable lead over Republican rival Donald Trump, many Democrats are predicting a landslide win in November.

But if Trump does lose, he's unlikely to just go away, NBC News reports.

Instead, with his ever-tighter ties to former Fox News chairman Roger Ailes (who is now reportedly advising the Republican candidate) and his recent hiring of former Breitbart chairman Steven Bannon, there's a growing chorus, propelled by a recent report in Vanity Fair, saying that Trump's endgame is not the nation's highest office — but to have a right-wing media outlet of his own.

If Trump lost in November and then launched his own media operation — a plan his campaign has repeatedly denied — what would it be exactly? And would it be a success?

"Losing in November would be the best thing that could happen, from a business standpoint," said Jon Klein, former president of CNN's U.S. operations.



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<![CDATA[Pence: 'No Path to Citizenship Unless People Leave' US]]> Sun, 28 Aug 2016 09:25:27 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/586220286-mike-pence-des-moines.jpg

Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence laid out an immigration policy for running mate Donald Trump Sunday morning that would grant some undocumented immigrants the opportunity to legally stay in the United States — after returning to their native country, NBC News reported.

"There will be no path to legalization, no path to citizenship unless people leave the country," Pence said on CNN's "State of the Union."

Despite Pence insisting that Trump's immigration positions "have been absolutely consistent," the GOP presidential nominee suggested this week he would be open to "softening" his intentions to create a "deportation force" and remove the entire undocumented immigrant population from the United States.

Pence, repeatedly asked whether a Trump administration would still deploy a "deportation force," demurred, but said Trump was only describing "a mechanism, not a policy" with the use of that term.



Photo Credit: Getty Images, File]]>
<![CDATA[Trump Campaign CEO Accused of Anti-Semitic Remarks ]]> Sat, 27 Aug 2016 15:53:47 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/SteveBannon-AP_16233666241411.jpg

The ex-wife of Steve Bannon claims he made anti-Semitic comments when the couple fought over which private school to send their daughters to nearly a decade ago, NBC News reported. 

The allegations were made in a sworn declaration by the ex-wife in a 2007 court filing. They were brought to light amid scrutiny over Bannon’s appointment as Donald Trump’s campaign CEO.

Three separate anti-Semitic remarks were allegedly made by Bannon while the couple toured Westland School, Willows Community School and The Archer School for Girls. 

NBC News reached out to Bannon's personal spokeswoman for comment, but was unable to reach her. 

The revelation followed news of a police report obtained by Politico late Thursday and confirmed by NBC News, in which the ex-wife claimed Bannon attacked her 20 years ago. Bannon was charged with three misdemeanor domestic violence-related charges and pleaded not guilty. The charges were dismissed six months later after prosecutors said they could not find his wife.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Trump: NBA Star's Cousin's Death is Why Blacks Will Vote for Me]]> Sun, 28 Aug 2016 12:40:48 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/DonaldTrump-AP_16217005627600.jpg

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump took to Twitter Saturday morning to comment on the fatal shooting of 32-year-old Nykea Aldridge on Chicago's South Side Friday afternoon. 

Aldridge, who police said was the unintended victim in a gang shooting, was the cousin of Bulls star and Chicago native Dwyane Wade. Trump tweeted: 

His initial tweet, posted around 8:30 a.m., misspelled Wade's first name. The tweet was then deleted and reposted just before 11:30 a.m., correcting the spelling error.

At 12:48 p.m., another tweet was sent from Trump's account saying "My condolences to Dwyane Wade and his family, on the loss of Nykea Aldridge. They are in my thoughts and prayers."

Aldridge was pushing a stroller with a child in the 6300 block of South Calumet Ave in the Parkway Gardens neighborhood when two men approached another man nearby and opened fire, according to police. She was struck by gunfire and taken to Stroger Hospital where she was pronounced dead, authorities said.

Family spokesperson Pastor Edward Jones said Aldridge was a mother of four, and just had a baby. She and her family had recently moved to the neighborhood, Jones said, and she was on her way to register her children for school when she was shot. 

"She loved God, loved her family," Jones said. "Just like everyone else, just wanted a better life, to live a better life. This is tragic because now it struck home with us. Something has to be done. This has got to stop."

Several people criticized Trump on social media, including television personality Star Jones, who said the GOP candidate was "thinking about himself," as others were thinking about the "senseless murder."

Others called him "the worst person alive right now" and told him to "delete your candidacy."

Actor Don Cheadle tweeted some choice words for the candidate, while actress Holly Robinson Peete wrote "I am just... I am so offended by this I can barely breathe."

Earlier in the week, Donald Trump was criticized for claiming in an interview on Monday that he knew a "top" Chicago police officer and believed that the city's violence could be stopped within one week using "tough police tactics."

The Chicago Police Department denied Trump's statement, as spokesperson Frank Giancamilli said, "We've discredited this claim months ago. No one in the senior command at CPD has ever met with Donald Trump or a member of his campaign." 

Derren Sorrells, 22, and Darwin Sorrells, 26, were arrested and charged with first degree murder in Aldridge's death on Sunday, according to police.



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<![CDATA[Clinton Receives 1st Classified Security Briefing as Nominee]]> Sat, 27 Aug 2016 09:05:06 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/Clinton-AP_16233409737100.jpg

Hillary Clinton received her first national security briefing Saturday as the Democratic presidential nominee, meeting with intelligence officials for an overview of the major threats facing the nation around the globe.

Clinton attended the briefing for more than two hours at the FBI office in White Plains, New York, near her suburban New York City home. Republican Donald Trump received his briefing earlier this month, a customary move for major party nominees, but one that has been the subject of a political tussle during the campaign.

Trump was campaigning on Saturday in Iowa, headlining Republican Sen. Joni Ernst's annual "Roast and Ride" fundraiser at the Iowa State Fairgrounds. The celebrity businessman was not planning to join the 42-mile motorcycle ride that is part of the event but bringing his campaign to a state where polls show a tight contest, a rare bright spot for Trump amid a sea of challenging battleground states.

The activities capped a week that saw some of the harshest exchanges between the two presidential rivals, with Clinton asserting in an MSNBC interview on Friday that Trump's campaign was built on "prejudice and paranoia" and he had catered to a radical fringe of the Republican Party. Trump, who is trying to win over moderate voters and minorities who have been unsettled by some of his provocative remarks and policy proposals, has tried to paint Clinton as a racist.

The Republican released an online video that includes footage of the former first lady referring to some young criminals as "super predators" in the 1990s. The video also shows Clinton's former Democratic rival, Sen. Bernie Sanders, denouncing the phrase as "a racist term." Clinton has since apologized. 

Clinton has said that Trump and his supporters have taken on extremist views, casting the race as "not a normal choice between a Republican and a Democrat." 

The back-and-forth has been waged in the national security space.

As President Barack Obama's secretary of state, Clinton held a high security clearance and received a copy of the President's Daily Brief — the highest-level U.S. intelligence document that includes sensitive intelligence and analysis from around the world.

Saturday's briefing was Clinton's first since becoming her party's nominee. Trump received his first briefing earlier this month.

The briefings, which are delivered by career staffers from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, have been customary for presidential nominees for more than 60 years to ensure a smooth transition for the next commander in chief. But the lead-up to the briefings for both candidates have been steeped in politics.

Prior to Trump's briefing, leading Democrats questioned whether the celebrity businessman could responsibly handle receiving sensitive information because of some of his comments, including the suggestion that Russia should attempt to hack Clinton's emails.

Trump and his supporters have said that Clinton's use of a private email server and FBI Director James Comey's rebuke of her "extremely careless" handling of classified information at the State Department should bar her from receiving the briefing.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, meanwhile, wrote National Intelligence Director James Clapper, saying that many questions remain about how Clinton handled her email and requested she not receive the briefings for the remainder of the campaign.

But Clapper rejected Ryan's request, responding that the meetings would be provided on a non-partisan basis. "I do not intend to withhold briefings from any officially nominated, eligible candidate," Clapper wrote.

Trump is also trying to shore up his standing with Latino voters. In Las Vegas, Trump met Friday with two dozen Latino supporters to discuss strategies for boosting Hispanic turnout in the swing state. He has sought to make the case that his economic policies would be better for small minority-owned businesses than those of Clinton.

"People don't know how well we're doing with the Hispanics, the Latinos," Trump said at his hotel just off the Vegas Strip. "We're doing really well."

Trump has suggested that minorities have been left behind by Democratic economic policies and hammered the nation's sluggish GDP growth as "a catastrophe."

But he has continued to send mixed signals about a key issue for many Latinos: immigration. While he has not wavered on his desire to build an impenetrable wall along the border with Mexico, he exhibited indecisiveness in recent days about his plan to deport 11 million immigrants living in the U.S. illegally. 

Aides have said he would announce his immigration policy in a speech in the coming days, but his campaign has yet to set a date.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Trump Campaign CEO Under Scrutiny for 1996 Charge]]> Fri, 26 Aug 2016 18:23:10 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/AP_16233666241411-stephen-bannon-trump-campaign.jpg

Stephen Bannon's appointment as chief executive of Donald Trump's campaign has drawn scrutiny to his personal history, including a 1996 arrest in a domestic-violence case that was ultimately dismissed, NBC News reported.

Court records show that Bannon was charged with three misdemeanors in Santa Monica, California, on Feb. 22, 1996, after his then-wife claimed he attacked her.

A police report obtained by Politico and confirmed by NBC News details a New Year's argument about finances that allegedly became physical. He pleaded not guilty to the charges, and about six months later the case was dismissed after prosecutors said they could not find his wife, court documents show.

Asked about the old charges, a personal spokeswoman for Bannon noted they had been dismissed, while the Trump campaign did not comment.



Photo Credit: AP, File]]>
<![CDATA[Trump Doctor Wrote Health Letter in Just 5 Minutes]]> Fri, 26 Aug 2016 15:35:02 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/harold-bornstein-trump-doctor.jpg

Donald Trump's personal physician said he wrote a letter declaring the Republican nominee would be the healthiest president in history in just five minutes while a limo sent by the candidate waited outside his Manhattan office.

Dr. Harold Bornstein, who has been Trump's doctor for 35 years, told NBC News on Friday that he stands by his glowing assessment of the 70-year-old's physical state.

"His health is excellent, especially his mental health," he said in an exclusive interview at his Park Avenue office.

In his letter, Bornstein said there were no "significant medical problems" in Trump's history and that a recent examination "showed only positive results." The letter was written and released in December but has drawn fresh scrutiny in recent days as Trump's allies have questioned Hillary Clinton's health. 



Photo Credit: NBC News
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<![CDATA[Fact Check: Jill Stein Over the Top on Sea Level Rise]]> Fri, 26 Aug 2016 14:16:03 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/594383000-jill-stein-green-party-presser.jpg

Green party presidential candidate Jill Stein cherry-picked the findings of a disputed study when she claimed that global warming would cause sea levels to rise on average “not one yard but many yards” in as soon as 50 years. Scientific consensus says a more realistic rise is 0.33 to 1.33 yards above current levels by 2100.

Stein made her claim in Washington, D.C., on Aug. 23 during a press conference in which she discussed her Aug. 21 visit to flooded areas in Louisiana and the natural disaster’s link to climate change.

According to a 2016 report by the National Academies of Sciences, global warming is expected to lead to more moisture in the atmosphere. This, in turn, can increase the frequency of extreme rainfall events like the one that recently took place in Louisiana.

Primarily affecting regions around Baton Rouge and Lafayette, the flood damaged tens of thousands of homes and killed 13 people, NPR reported. The Red Cross also called the flood “likely the worst natural disaster in the United States since 2012’s Superstorm Sandy.”

Stein did accurately state, “Any one storm cannot be definitively pegged to climate change, but when you see so many at such extreme levels, there’s no question, according to the scientists, that this is a consequence of warmer air that holds much more water.” But then she moved on to exaggerate the extent of projected sea level rise.

Stein, Aug. 23: There are these growing warnings about sea level rise, according to James Hansen, the foremost climate scientist … he is predicting meters-worth, that is yards-worth — not one yard but many yards worth — of sea level rise as soon as 50 years from now. And that of course would be an absolutely devastating sea level rise that would essentially wipe out coastal population centers, including the likes of Manhattan, and Florida and so on, and actually all over the world, the entire country of Bangladesh.

This isn’t the first time Stein has exaggerated the extent of projected global sea level rise. But it is the first time she has cited Hansen’s work while making her claim.

Scientific Consensus on Sea Level Rise

Hansen, a climate scientist at Columbia University, and colleagues did conclude, “Continued high fossil fuel emissions this century are predicted to yield … sea level rise, reaching several meters over a timescale of 50–150 years” in a study published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics in March 2016.

However, reports by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the U.S. Global Change Research Program, which are both collaborations of hundreds of scientists, project a much smaller rise over a longer period than Hansen.

The 2013 IPCC report predicts an average rise of between 0.26 to 0.98 meters (1 meter = 1.09 yards) in the global sea level by 2100, with the higher end entailing a high greenhouse gas emissions scenario.

The 2016 Global Change report similarly projects a 1 to 4 feet (3 feet = 1 yard) rise by 2100. However, the report also states, “In the context of risk-based analysis, some decision makers may wish to use a wider range of scenarios, from 8 inches to 6.6 feet by 2100.” Still, 6.6 feet translates to 2.2 yards, which is not “many” yards, and it also would not occur in “as soon as 50 years.”

In his paper, Hansen and colleagues argue that ice covering the North and South poles will melt at rates much faster than predicted by the IPCC and others. Instead of a linear rate, the researchers argue the rate will grow exponentially, doubling every 10, 20 or 40 years. This will lead to “multi-meter” global mean sea level rise in about 50, 100 or 200 years, respectively, the authors conclude.

But the group also admits that, while the data they analyzed are “consistent with” a multi-meter sea level rise in around 50 years, they “cannot exclude slower responses.” This is why the researchers give a timescale of 50 to 150 years to reach several meters of sea level rise.

In an email to us, Hansen also explained, “If we stay on business-as-usual high emissions, I would say that several meters [of sea level rise] is unlikely in 50 years, though possible. In 100 years it is likely, and I can’t see how it could be avoided in 200 years.”

But back in March, Michael Mann, director of the Earth System Science Center at Penn State University and a lead author on a chapter of the IPCC’s third report, told The Guardian: “I’m always hesitant to ignore the findings and warnings of James Hansen; he has proven to be so very prescient when it comes to his early prediction about global warming. That having been said, I’m unconvinced that we could see melting rates over the next few decades anywhere near his exponential predictions, and everything else is contingent upon those melting rates being reasonable.”

In 1988, Hansen, then a NASA scientist, testified before Congress on the dangers of global warming. His testimony instigated broader awareness of the issue, which has led some to call him the “father of climate change awareness.”

Steven Goodbred Jr., an environmental scientist at Vanderbilt University and expert on sea level rise in Bangladesh, agrees with Mann that Hansen’s warnings should be heeded, but also said Hansen’s latest findings are over the top. “Meters of sea level rise would require major collapse of Greenland or East Antarctic ice sheets,” Goodbred told us by email. “While improbable, the evidence that Hansen et al put forth warns us not to think impossible.”

Not as Simple as Sea Level Rise

Goodbred also told us issues in Bangladesh, which Stein mentioned specifically, can’t be boiled down to sea level rise. The Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers, which flow from China and India to Bangladesh, together “deliver the largest sediment load on earth” at around 1 billion metric tons per year, he explained. “That sediment distributed across Bangladesh’s low-lying coastal region could keep pace” with the current rate of sea level rise, “perhaps with relatively limited consequences (though certainly not none).”

Along these lines, “any reduction in that supply would harm the system’s ability to respond to sea level rise,” added Goodbred. “Threats to sediment delivery (that are more probable than Hansen et al scenarios) include dam construction, water diversion, and increased irrigation/water extraction in upstream areas of India and China.” Many of these modifications to the river systems are already planned or ongoing, he said, and represent as much of a threat to Bangladesh as sea level rise does.

Mann told us the situation in Florida and Manhattan, which Stein also pointed to specifically, can’t be reduced to sea level rise either. “Even 5-6 m of sea level rise would not submerge New York City, or most of Florida,” he said.

“Due to the threat to our coastlines from the combined effect of sea level rise and potentially more potent hurricanes, we might indeed be looking at managed retreat from coastal regions like Miami and New York City on a timeframe of 50 years,” he added. “But it wouldn’t be because of inundation of these regions. It would be because the cost to insure property would become prohibitive given the greatly increased coastal risk.”

In other words, Miami and Manhattan probably won’t be completely underwater in 50 years, but it may become too expensive for many to live there due to increased property insurance costs.

Stein was on the mark when she said warmer air, which can hold more water, has the potential to bring about more extreme weather events, such as the one in Louisiana.

But her claim that global warming would cause sea levels to rise on average “not one yard but many yards” in as soon as 50 years is “an example of a greatly exaggerated version of reality that has a kernel of truth to it,” Mann told us.

Current scientific consensus puts the likely global mean sea level rise at a maximum 1.33 yards above current levels by 2100. And for Manhattan, Florida and Bangladesh in particular, issues go above and beyond sea level rise.

Editor’s Note: SciCheck is made possible by a grant from the Stanton Foundation.



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<![CDATA[More US Companies Pledge Equal Pay for Women]]> Fri, 26 Aug 2016 14:04:34 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/OBAMA_WOMEN_GettyImages-540174764.jpg

Twenty-nine additional employers have signed on to the White House equal pay pledge, which asks companies to conduct a yearly analysis of pay by gender with the goal of eliminating unequal compensation.

Apple, Chobani, Delta Air Lines, Facebook, General Motors, Hilton, IBM and IKEA are among the companies and organizations that have joined the effort, bringing the total to more than 50, according to the White House. Friday’s announcement was made on Women’s Equality Day, which commemorates women’s right to vote.

President Barack Obama initiated the pledge in June as part of a summit on women, the United State of Women. The companies also agree to review hiring and promotions practices and to promote practices that will close the national wage gap.

A typical woman working full-time earned only 79 percent that paid to a typical man in 2014, according to the White House.

The Labor Department also added protections for transgender men and women to guidelines for federal contractors that are meant to guard against sex discrimination.

The first piece of legislation that Obama signed after taking office was the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, which overturned restrictions on time periods in which discrimination complaints could be filed.

The Obama administration also extended minimum wage and overtime to more than 2 million home health-care workers, many of them women.

Fifty-seven percent of women are in the labor force, down from 60 percent in 1999, according to the United States Department of Labor.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Clinton Defends Work of Family Foundation]]> Fri, 26 Aug 2016 06:23:51 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/ClintonAltRight-AP_16238837035319.jpg

Hillary Clinton is defending the work of her family foundation, saying the organization needs more time to ensure the continuity of their programs. 

If elected, Clinton said she'll take additional steps to make sure there are no conflicts of interest between her administration and the global charitable network founded by her husband. 

Winding down the programs and finding partners, she said, takes time. 

"We're going to make sure we don't undermine the excellence and the results," she said in an interview with MSNBC's "Morning Joe.". 

Former President Bill Clinton announced last week that if Hillary Clinton is elected president, the Clinton Foundation would no longer accept foreign and corporate donations, he would step down from its board and he no longer would raise money for the organization. 



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Woman Shocked by Trump's 'Bigot' Comment at Rally]]> Thu, 25 Aug 2016 06:40:42 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/214*120/GettyImages-594878936.jpg

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, who has been aggressively courting African-American voters in recent weeks, accused Hillary Clinton of being a "bigot" who panders to minorities.

"Hillary Clinton is a bigot who sees people of color only as votes, not as human beings worthy of a better future," Trump said Wednesday during a campaign rally in Jackson, Mississippi.

The remark appeared to catch many in the predominately white crowd by surprise, particularly a woman standing on stage behind Trump. Video of the woman grimacing at the comment as her eyes widened in shock was shared on social media. Her reaction seemed to encapsulate the audience's uncertain response: a delayed round of staggered cheers and applause.

"She doesn't care what her policies have done to your communities," the businessman continued. "She has no remorse. She's going to do nothing for Hispanics and African-Americans."

During an interview Wednesday night with CNN's Anderson Cooper, Clinton dismissed Trump's comments and accused him of "peddling" hate speech.

"He is taking a hate movement mainstream," the former secretary of state said, arguing Trump is "very much peddling bigotry and prejudice and paranoia."

Clinton is set to address Trump's recent attacks in a speech in Nevada on Thursday afternoon.

Critics have repeatedly accused Trump of pushing racist and bigoted views during his campaign, including calling for the U.S. to build a wall across its Mexican border to stem illegal immigration and to fight terrorism by temporarily banning Muslims from entering the U.S.

Trump also gave a vague preview of his new immigration policy, which is slated to be unveiled next week. Without offering any specifics, he said any immigration policy he supports must pass three tests: It should improve the wages, safety and quality of life for U.S. citizens.

The Associated Press contributed to this story.



Photo Credit: Getty Images
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<![CDATA[Trump Openly Weighs a Massive Immigration Reversal]]> Wed, 24 Aug 2016 19:21:26 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/Trump-AP_778476028199.jpg

During a town hall that aired Wednesday, Donald Trump floated the possibility of allowing undocumented immigrants to remain in the country, NBC News reported. 

"No citizenship," Trump told Fox News' Sean Hannity in an interview taped Tuesday afternoon in Austin, Texas. "Let me go a step further — they'll pay back-taxes, they have to pay taxes, there's no amnesty, as such, there's no amnesty, but we work with them." 

Trump said he was moved by people concerned with his calls for a “deportation force” to remove all 11 million undocumented people from the United States. 

"When I look at the rooms and I have this all over, now everybody agrees we get the bad ones out," Trump said. "But when I go through and I meet thousands and thousands of people on this subject...they've said, Mr. Trump, I love you, but to take a person that has been here for 15 or 20 years and throw them and the family out, it's so tough, Mr. Trump."



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[UK's Nigel Farage to Appear at Trump Rally in Mississippi]]> Wed, 24 Aug 2016 17:55:22 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/farage-trump-split.jpg

Nigel Farage, the former head of the UK Independence Party, will accompany Donald Trump when the Republican presidential candidate continues to court African-American voters Wednesday night in Mississippi, NBC News reported. 

Farage confirmed a Sky News report that he’ll appear at the Trump event in Jackson, Mississippi, where he plans on telling the “story of Brexit.” 

Even though he’ll appear with Trump, he won’t be endorsing the candidate. Farage said in an interview that would be hypocritical, since he condemned President Barack Obama for wading into the Brexit campaign during his visit to London. 

Trump’s spokeswoman Hope Hicks did not respond to NBC News’ request for comment about Farage’s appearance.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Trump: Perry Will 'Do Well' If He Challenges Cruz for Senate]]> Wed, 24 Aug 2016 11:46:04 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/trump43.jpg

Donald Trump is applauding the prospect of former Texas Gov. Rick Perry mounting a possible primary challenge against Republican Sen. Ted Cruz in 2018, saying, "Boy, will he do well." 

At a fundraiser in downtown Austin, Trump was standing next to Perry when he was asked about the Texan's chance to unseat his state's junior senator. Cruz, who unsuccessfully fought Trump for the Republican presidential nomination, notably declined to endorse him at last month's GOP national convention and faces re-election in 2018. 

In a recording of the event first posted online by a Democratic group, the Lone Star Project, Trump answers that he's been "hearing a lot about that." 

"I don't know if he wants to do it, but boy, will he do well," Trump says of Perry. "People love him in Texas. And he was one great governor." 

Two fundraiser attendees verified the recording on Wednesday on the condition that their names not be published. The fundraiser occurred Tuesday. 

Trump hasn't been shy about criticizing fellow Republicans — even those up for re-election. He initially declined to endorse House Speaker Paul Ryan's re-election bid earlier this summer, then formally threw his support behind it before Ryan crushed a primary challenger in his Wisconsin district. 

Cruz sparked an outcry at the GOP convention in Cleveland last month by refusing to endorse Trump during his prime-time speech — rebuffing calls for Republican Party unity behind its nominee. 

Perry left office last year and was a harsh Trump critic as he briefly ran for the Republican presidential nomination, even calling the billionaire businessman a cancer on conservatism. Perry has since endorsed Trump and become a surrogate who has praised him on national television. 

The former governor has kept a low profile since dropping out of the 2016 presidential race last fall. Recent polls suggest Cruz's popularity in Texas has suffered since his convention speech, and one even indicated that Perry would top Cruz in a hypothetical matchup. 

Those close to Perry say he's laughed off the idea of a Senate run, but Perry hasn't publicly ruled it out. 

While running for president, Cruz originally said he'd endorse whoever the eventual Republican nominee was. He said later he'd changed his mind because Trump insulted his family during the bitter White House campaign. 

Mica Mosbacher, an Austin resident and former finance co-chairwoman of the Republican National Committee, was a vocal supporter of Cruz's presidential run but is now is backing Trump. 

"I am deeply disappointed in our senator that he did not honor his pledge," Mosbacher said by phone Wednesday, referring to Cruz's reneging support for Trump. "And I, along with a lot of other donors, are very upset." 



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Chicago Police Dismiss Trump's Claim That Violence Could Be Stopped in a Week]]> Wed, 24 Aug 2016 05:14:26 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/chicago+police+GettyImages-500346628.jpg

The Chicago Police Department denied Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's claim this week that he met with a "top" Chicago officer and argued the city's violence would not be solved with "tough police tactics."

"We've discredited this claim months ago," CPD spokesperson Frank Giancamilli said Tuesday in a statement. "No one in the senior command at CPD has ever met with Donald Trump or a member of his campaign."

Trump said in an interview Monday that he believed Chicago's violence could be stopped using "tough police tactics," telling Fox News' Bill O'Reilly that he met a "top" Chicago officer who reportedly said he could "stop much of this horror show that’s going on" within a single week. 

Trump added that he knows officers in Chicago who would put an end to violent crime "if they were given the authority to do it," a claim that Giancamilli refuted. 

"Beyond that, the best way to address crime is through a commitment to community policing and a commitment to stronger laws to keep illegal guns and repeat violent offenders off the street," Giancamilli added.

Trump told O'Reilly he didn’t ask the officer for specifics on the plan because he isn’t the mayor of Chicago, but added that police would be "much tougher than they are right now."

"I’m sure he’s got a strategy," Trump added. "I didn’t ask him his strategy."

Trump also claimed that he submitted the officer’s name for some sort of job.

"I sent his name in and I said, 'you probably should hire this guy because you have nothing to lose,'" Trump said. "Look at what’s going on in Chicago, it’s horrible. This guy felt totally confident that he could stop it in a very short period of time."

Trump's campaign told the Chicago Tribune Tuesday that he did not specifically say the officer he spoke with was in senior command, but rather he "spoke with some talented and dedicated police officers on a prior visit."

It's not the first time Chicago police have disagreed with Trump's claims.

During Trump's failed Chicago rally, which was canceled due to violence concerns, the candidate said he met with law enforcement before canceling his appearance. CPD said in a statement, however, the department had not advised Trump's campaign to cancel the rally and did not issue any public safety threats or safety risks.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Justin Timberlake Hosts HRC in LA]]> Wed, 24 Aug 2016 03:56:27 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/205*120/08-23-2016-timberlake-clinton.jpg

On the narrow street leading to the home of Justin Timberlake and Jessica Biel, there are orders for no parking and no stopping.

Unless you're invited, there is no way to reach the house serving as backdrop for the third Hillary Clinton campaign fundraiser in SoCal in just two days.

The Democratic presidential nominee will wrap her a two-day visit to Los Angeles and Orange counties Tuesday with a star-studded fundraiser at the Timberlake-Biel Hollywood Hills abode before heading on to two fundraisers in Laguna Beach.

It's at the home of the iconic pop singer where a luncheon running at $33,400 per person will be held.

Everyone from actors Tobey Maguire and Jennifer Aniston to TV producer Shonda Rhimes are expected. 

The event was punctuated by a tweet from the super-star couple with Clinton sandwiched in the middle, featuring the hashtag "I'm with her."

The event was originally scheduled to be hosted by actor Leonardo DiCaprio. A change in the production schedule for DiCaprio's upcoming climate change documentary meant the Oscar winner could not attend, according to People magazine, which cited a source close to the event. 

Clinton will then hold another $33,400 per person lunch fundraiser in Laguna Beach, which includes a photo with Clinton. Couples paying $100,000 are also admitted to a host reception with Clinton, according to an invitation obtained by City News Service.

Clinton will conclude her Southland visit with another Laguna Beach fundraiser, with tickets priced at $2,700, the maximum individual contribution to a presidential candidate in the general election under federal law. Guests raising $27,000 are admitted to a host reception with Clinton.

The $33,400 figure is the maximum amount an individual can contribute to a national party committee in a year.

Clinton began the visit Monday by taping an appearance on the ABC late- night talk show "Jimmy Kimmel Live" and holding two fundraisers. In her appearance with Kimmel, Clinton made light of both the revelation that the FBI collected nearly 15,000 new emails in its investigation of her and Republican presidential nominee Donald J. Trump and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani questioning her health.

Clinton told Kimmel "my emails are so boring and I'm embarrassed about that."

When Kimmel asked 68-year-old Clinton about the questions about her health, she offered up her hand and said "take my pulse," explaining "to make sure I'm still alive."

Kimmel then took her hand and gasped, telling the audience, "Oh my god, there's nothing there."

Clinton implied that the stories are baseless, saying sarcastically, "With every breath I take, I feel like it's a new lease on life."

Much of the speculation stems from a concussion Clinton sustained in December 2012 after fainting, an episode her doctor has attributed to a stomach virus and dehydration. Giuliani urged voters to "go online and put down `Hillary Clinton illness,"' in an interview with Fox News on Sunday, saying the next morning that she "looks sick." Trump has questioned her stamina at campaign rallies and speeches, saying in a foreign policy address earlier this month that she "lacks the mental and physical stamina to take on ISIS".

When Kimmel asked about her preparations for the three debates with Trump, Clinton said she's taking the match-up seriously but is getting ready for "wacky stuff."

Her first fundraiser Monday was at the home of Basketball Hall of Fame member Earvin "Magic" Johnson near Beverly Hills, with co-hosts including actors Denzel Washington and Samuel L. Jackson. The second fundraiser at the Beverly Hills home of Haim Saban, the chairman and CEO of the Saban Capital Group, Inc., whose assets include the Spanish-language television network Univision.

Tickets began at $2,700 per person, according to an invitation obtained by City News Service.

Like nearly all fundraisers for presidential candidates, the events were closed to reporters.

Clinton's visit began one day after the Republican National Committee released a 19-second paid web ad critical of "Hillary Clinton's liberal elite summer tour with frequent stops in Beverly Hills, Hollywood and Cape Cod."



Photo Credit: AP
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<![CDATA[Trump's History Undermines New Outreach to Black Voters]]> Tue, 23 Aug 2016 08:45:09 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/trump40.jpg

Donald Trump began to reach out to African-American voters over the past week and boasted that he would win 95 percent of the black vote in a theoretical re-election bid in 2020. Don't count on it. 

Right now the Republican presidential nominee receives the support of just 8 percent of black voters, according to the latest NBC News Survey Monkey weekly election tracking poll.

Allegations of racism have rocked Trump's campaign from the beginning. NBC News has broken down several reasons why black voters appear cool to the candidate.

Among the reasons: Trump and his father were accused in the past of systematically discriminating against black tenants seeking rentals in their buildings; his past support of the so-called Central Park Five, a group of wrongfully convicted black and Latino teens accused of beating and raping a white female jogger; More recently, Trump retweeted an image of a gun toting, unidentified African-American next to bogus crime statistics; and Trump's break with precedent by ignoring or turning down invitations from predominately black groups.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Thousands More Clinton Emails to Be Released]]> Tue, 23 Aug 2016 04:03:04 -0700 http://media.nbcsandiego.com/images/213*120/Clinton-AP_16233409737100.jpg

The State Department said Monday it is reviewing nearly 15,000 previously undisclosed emails recovered as part of the FBI's now-closed investigation into the handling of sensitive information that flowed through Hillary Clinton's private home server.

Lawyers for the department told U.S. District Court Judge James E. Boasberg on Monday that they anticipate processing and releasing the first batch of these new emails in mid-October, raising the prospect new messages sent or received by Democratic nominee could become public just before November's presidential election. The judge is overseeing production of the emails as part of a federal public-records lawsuit filed by the conservative legal advocacy group Judicial Watch.

Representing the State Department, Justice Department lawyer Lisa Olson told Boasberg that officials do not yet know what portion of the emails is work-related rather than personal. Clinton, the Democratic nominee for president, served as secretary of state from 2009 to 2013. She has claimed that she deleted only personal emails prior to returning over 55,000 pages of her work-related messages to the State Department last year.

The State Department has publicly released most of those work-related emails, although some have been withheld because they contain information considered sensitive to national security.

Republicans are pressing to keep the issue of Clinton's email use alive after the FBI closed its investigation last month without recommending criminal charges. GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump routinely criticizes Clinton for her handling of emails containing classified information.

Olson told the judge that State earlier this month received seven disks containing "tens of thousands" of emails Clinton sent or received during her tenure as the nation's top diplomat. The first disk, labeled by the FBI as containing non-classified emails not previously disclosed by Clinton, contains about 14,900 documents, Olson said. The second disk is labeled as emails containing classified information.

Olson told Boasberg she could not immediately say how many emails are contained on the rest of the disks or how many might be copies of emails Clinton already has provided.

Given the large volume of messages, Olson said it was "extremely ambitious" for the agency to complete its review and begin releasing the first batches of emails to Judicial Watch by Oct. 14.

Judicial Watch lawyer Lauren Burke told Boasberg that the proposed schedule is too slow and pressed for faster release of the emails from the first disk. The judge ordered the department to focus its efforts on processing the emails from the first disk and to report back to him on its progress by Sept. 22.

As part of proceedings in a separate Judicial Watch lawsuit, a federal judge on Friday ordered Clinton to answer written questions from the group about why she chose to rely on a private server located in the basement of her New York home, rather than use a government email account.

Clinton's spokesman Brian Fallon said Monday: "As we have always said, Hillary Clinton provided the State Department with all the work-related emails she had in her possession in 2014. We are not sure what additional materials the Justice Department may have located, but if the State Department determines any of them to be work-related, then obviously we support those documents being released publicly as well."



Photo Credit: AP]]>