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Searchers Find 3 Missing Wisconsin Teens

The sheriff announced the boys had been located after a search that involved 100 people, dogs and thermal imaging

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    Searchers had concentrated their efforts on a mine.

    Searchers located three teenage boys on Monday that they had feared gotten lost in a labyrinthine abandoned mine in Wisconsin. 

    The boys — Tate Rose and Zachary Heron, both 16, and 15-year-old Samuel Lein — had last been seen Sunday, and Dodge County Sheriff Dale Schmidt said their bikes were found off a road near an entrance to the mine. 

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    The sheriff announced in a two-sentence email on Monday afternoon that the boys had been located after a search that involved 100 people, dogs and thermal imaging. But Schmidt offered no other information about the boys being found. 

    Sheriff's office communications director Christine Churchill said in a separate email that the boys were safe and a news release would come later Monday. She didn't immediately respond to a follow-up message asking where the boys were located.

    Searchers had concentrated their efforts on the mine, which Schmidt described as a "vast maze" of interconnected tunnels that goes on for 4 miles. 

    The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee owns the mines. University officials estimate 100,000 bats live in the mine, which is among the Midwest's largest winter shelters for bats.

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