Georgia State Wildlife Officers Searching For 14 Pythons After Pet Snakes Escape | NBC 7 San Diego
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Georgia State Wildlife Officers Searching For 14 Pythons After Pet Snakes Escape

The owner told authorities the snakes were in secure cages, and she suspects someone set them free deliberately

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    A Georgia woman is searching for 14 pet pythons after an acquaintance intentionally released the snakes into a South Carolina forest. (Published Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016)

    In a real life version of the children's reader "Snakes Alive!", state wildlife officers are searching for 14 pythons in an east Georgia subdivision after a woman reported that someone let the pet snakes loose.

    Jacqueline Heim told authorities the snakes were in secure cages. She suspects someone set them free deliberately this week.

    Heim tells WRDW-TV the ball pythons are not harmful. Ball pythons, sometimes known as royal pythons, are so named because their key defense against predators is to roll up in a ball.

    Priscilla Crisler of Augusta Animal Services says the snakes "typically are very docile."

    Pig Escapes Slaughterhouse Fate, Sells Original Paintings

    [NATL] Pig Escapes Slaughterhouse Fate, Sells Original Paintings

    A pig who escaped slaughter is now living out her life in a South African sanctuary and painting original works that have sold for up to $2,000.

    "She was really small when I rescued her," said Joanne Lefson, who manages the South African Farm Sanctuary, a haven for rescued farm animals where the pig now lives. "She's very smart and intelligent so I placed a few balls and some paintbrushes and things in her pen, and it wasn't long before I discovered that she really liked the bristles and the paintbrush...She just really took a knack for it."

    Funds from the art sales go towards the sanctuary.

    (Published Wednesday, March 29, 2017)

    But neighbors like Shekelia Wilcher are on edge. Wilcher tells WJBF-TV that young children in the neighborhood wait for their school bus and "one might just crawl up on them."

    The neighborhood is in Hephzibah, about 15 miles south of Augusta.