DOJ Considering Reopening Emmett Till Murder Case, Family Says | NBC 7 San Diego
National & International News
The day’s top national and international news

DOJ Considering Reopening Emmett Till Murder Case, Family Says

In 1955, 14-year-old Till was savagely beaten and shot in the head by Roy Bryant and J.W. Milam

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    DOJ Considering Reopening Emmett Till Murder Case, Family Says
    AP
    Emmett Till, left, and Carolyn Bryant. Bryant has acknowledged that she falsely testified that Till made physical and verbal threats, according to a new book.

    The Department of Justice is considering reopening the investigation into the infamous murder of Emmett Till — an African-American teen whose brutal killing charted the course of the civil rights movement-- after meeting with the boy's family, NBC News reported.

    Till's cousin, Deborah Watts, said U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions told her "no one gets a pass," adding that he would like to look into more unsolved civil rights crimes during a meeting with her and civil rights activist Alvin Sykes, according to the Jackson Clarion-Ledger.

    In 1955, 14-year-old Till was savagely beaten and shot in the head by Roy Bryant and J.W. Milam after Bryant's wife, Carolyn Bryant Donham, said the boy whistled at her and touched her in a Mississippi store.

    And Donham, now 82, recently recanted her story to author Timothy B. Tyson, telling him she lied about the incident.

    Sanders Vs. Reporters Over Latest Fake News Tirade

    [NATL] Sanders Argues With Reporters Over Latest Fake News Tirade

    White House deputy press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders displayed the administrations's antagonism against the media in heated exchanges with members of the White House press corp during the daily press briefing on Tuesday, June 27, 2017. Sanders pointed to a retracted CNN story as basis of the White House's "frustration" and skepticism with ongoing coverage, while one reporter accused the White House of "inflammatory rhetoric."

    (Published Tuesday, June 27, 2017)