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Carmelo Anthony Gathers Athletes, Cops and Kids in Conversation

He met with basketball stars, community leaders and police to discuss respect, communication and safety

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    New York Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony speaks with Tamika Catchings of the WNBA Indiana Fever as they spent the U.S. Olympic basketball team's precious day off running a two-hour town hall meeting at a South Los Angeles youth center Monday, July 25, 2016. Anthony gathered basketball stars, community leaders and police officers to speak with teenagers and young adults about the importance of respect, communication and safety.

    Carmelo Anthony spent the U.S. Olympic basketball team's precious day off running a two-hour town hall meeting at a South Los Angeles youth center because he can't sleep anymore. 

    With only a few spare hours Monday before jetting off to continue the Americans' pre-Olympic tour, Anthony gathered basketball stars, community leaders and police officers to speak with teenagers and young adults about the importance of respect, communication and safety. Roughly 200 people came together for the meeting, and Anthony believes everyone left with something to contemplate. 

    "We really got a lot of messages out of today," Anthony said. "Hopefully we can continue this dialogue, and we created something today that will continue on." 

    Anthony shares many Americans' profound disquiet with gun violence after this year's series of increasingly dismaying shootings. With both the men's and women's Olympic teams in Los Angeles at the same time, the New York Knicks star recruited fellow Olympian Tamika Catchings and other like-minded athletes at the Challengers Boys and Girls Club to begin a badly needed nationwide conversation. 

    "There were some very, very powerful messages that were being talked about," Anthony said. "Not just amongst us as athletes, but among the youth. The youth really spoke out today about how they feel about their community, how they feel about police officers, how they feel about relationships and how we can mend these relationships." 

    Anthony's awakening interest in social activism was piqued after he spent a day watching news coverage of the latest shootings earlier this month. He awoke in the middle of the night and wrote a 280-word Instagram post declaring that the "system is broken" and calling on sports figures to lead change. 

    "The first thing that came to my mind was, I have to get my athletes, my fellow athletes, to step up and use their voice and use their platform in the best way they can," Anthony said. 

    Two weeks ago, he took the stage at the ESPY Awards with Chris Paul, LeBron James and Dwyane Wade. The four superstars decried violence and called for open conversation on racial issues. 

    Anthony backed up the group's words before Team USA left Los Angeles following an exhibition game on Sunday night. He plans to keep finding ways to facilitate communication after this gathering led to frank discussions. 

    Catchings recalled young adults telling police officers about the fear they feel when approached by officers with their hands on their guns. One young woman told officers: "Just smile! A smile goes a long way." 

    "Definitely tension, and definitely some tears," said Catchings, the three-time Olympic gold medalist and former WNBA MVP. "One young lady said that when she got off the bus and saw the [police] uniform, right off the bat, she was scared. 

    "But coming into this environment and hearing everything, she [said], 'I doubted if I really wanted to be a part of it, but I'm so glad I came, because now I feel like I'm walking away with so much more than I thought I was going to get.' When you have conversations like that and you get feedback like that, we know we're going in the right direction." 

    The community leaders invited by Anthony echoed his confidence in the importance of communication, particularly between police and young black men. Deputy Chief Bill Scott of the LAPD brought a large group of officers to join the meeting. 

    "Many of the kids in our group said, 'We're thrilled to be here,'" said Calvin Lyons, the CEO of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Metro Los Angeles. "'We have a higher level of respect for the officers because of what they're sharing.' There was no fear." 

    Anthony hopes to be a three-time Olympic gold medalist at this time next month, possibly capping a remarkable international career with another title in Rio before he heads back to the Knicks. He knows his work in American communities will go on much longer than even his NBA career, but he welcomes the challenge. 

    "We know that nothing is going to happen overnight," Anthony said. "But what we wanted to do was create something that we could start right now, and continue on when we leave here today."