Cedar Fire 10 Years Later, Share Your Memories

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    SAN DIEGO, CA - OCTOBER 29: Kendra Lipka hugs her daughter Rachel, 5, after seeing their home in ruins October 29, 2003 in the Scripps Ranch area of San Diego, California. Residents were allowed to back to their homes after the Crest wildfire erupted on October 26, destroying over 100 homes in the area. (Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)

    This week is the tenth anniversary of the devastating Cedar Fire. NBC 7 is putting together the opportunity for San Diegans to share their memories of the firestorm.

    On October 25, 2003, flames broke out in San Diego’s East County and continued to march west becoming the largest fire in California's history.

    Fourteen people died, 2,820 structures burned and 273,246 acres burned in the fire that forced families to grab their belongings and seek shelter at high schools around the county as well as Qualcomm Stadium in Mission Valley.

    NBC 7 is putting together the opportunity for people to share their memories of The 2003 Firestorm and the firefighters and first responders who came to our aid. Visit our Facebook and Twitter pages on October 25 and use the hashtag #CedarFireMemory to share yours.

    We’re also partnering with the San Diego Regional Fire Foundation whose mission it is to provide fire and emergency service crews with the equipment they need as well as to coordinate between departments in a time of crisis.

    Share your memories and enter to win the chance for you and three others to tour a Lakeside fire station and have dinner with firefighters.

    You can enter to qualify for the giveaway on Oct. 25.

    The SD Regional Fire Foundation works to fund San Diego’s rural fire stations that respond to the backcountry wildfires like those that developed into fire storms in 2003 and again in 2007.

    Frank Ault, Chairman, SD Regional Fire Foundation, said since the Cedar Fire there have been thousands of fires in San Diego's rural backcountry.

    "Fortunately, our firefighters are able to extinguish these fires while they are small, before they become the major fire storms like we saw in 2003 and 2007. However, while putting these fires out, equipment gets destroyed or used up," Ault said.

    "It’s not just after the big fires, but equipment, such as fire hose and firefighters’ protective clothing, must be continually replaced in order to keep our firefighters adequately prepared to respond to each fire."

    To support their efforts to replace worn out equipment for our firefighter you can donate online at sdfirefoundation.org.