San Diegans React to Debt Limit Deal

View Comments ()
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    In San Diego, there's sense of skepticism from some and relief from others that Congress and President Barack Obama announced a compromise promising cuts and raising the debt ceiling. (Published Monday, Aug 1, 2011)

    In San Diego, there's a sense of skepticism from some and relief from others that Congress and President Barack Obama announced a compromise promising cuts and raising the debt ceiling.

    After a tense weekend of bargaining, both sides appeared to agree on legislation that would slice more than $2 trillion from federal spending over a decade and permit the nation's $14.3 trillion borrowing cap to rise by up to $2.4 trillion, enough to keep the government afloat through the 2012 elections.

    Relief, Skepticism Over Debt Ceiling Deal

    [DGO] Relief, Skepticism Over Debt Ceiling Deal
    In San Diego, there's sense of skepticism from some and relief from others that Congress and President Barack Obama announced a compromise promising cuts and raising the debt ceiling. (Published Monday, Aug 1, 2011)

    Highlights of budget and debt limit pact

    “I'm glad they finally came to some kind of agreement,” said San Diego resident Cesar Medina.

    “Is that really cuts or are we doing increases of 10 percent and then making cuts or are they doing cuts like how we do cuts in a normal family?” asked Shannan Schwarz.

    “Even if they're so worried about making the wrong decision; it was hurting just not having one at all,” said Kerry Roache.

    The impact on personal finances is a big concern for many.

    In a military housing section of Paradise Valley, every household would be impacted if the government couldn't send paychecks on time.

    “I have a pretty big family; it's me, my wife and seven children so if we were not to get paid it would be a financial strain on us,” said Miguel Dominguez.

    And if he defaults on family bills, it could mean a hit to his credit score and more.

    “A lot of the military require clearances and our credit report definitely affects our clearances. So it could have a negative impact on my career,” Dominguez said.

    Top Obama aide David Plouffe on Monday morning said the deal was worthy of passage in both the House and Senate, even if no one got all they wanted and despite the protracted political battle that forced a jittery nation to endure a "three-ring circus" in Washington.

    Let us know what you think. Comment below, send us your thoughts via Twitter @nbcsandiego or add your comment to our Facebook page.