Occupiers Attempt Citizens Arrest of Mayor over Snapdragon Decision

About two dozen occupiers were met by police in the mayor's lobby.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    NBCSanDiego
    Occupy SD activist Ray Lutz at the Mayor's office Monday.

    Occupy San Diego activists marched into City Hall Monday morning, looking to make a "citizen's arrest" of Mayor Jerry Sanders.

    About two dozen occupiers were met by police in the mayor's lobby. They chanted "Jail Jerry" as they stormed the building. He was said to be out of the office, on business.

    The group then filed complaints with the city clerk, city attorney and district attorney.

    They accused Sanders of "felony embezzlement" in connection with his agreement with Qualcomm to temporarily change the name of the stadium to Snapdragon, the company's new mobile processor.

    Qualcomm paid the city a thousand dollars to put "Snapdragon", the name of the company's new mobile processor, on the stadium for ten days.

    City Attorney Jan Goldsmith that ruled a Municipal Code violation because Sanders made the deal without approval from the City Council.


    Read more Sanders' decision to allow the Qualcomm name change here.


    An advertising expert estimates Qualcomm reaped $125,000 to half a million dollars worth of exposure from the Poinsettia and Holiday Bowls, and a Chargers-Ravens game on NBC's "Football Night in America."

    City Attorney Goldsmith recently issued a memo announcing that the deal lacked legal authority because the Council didn't waive the relevant provisions of the city's sign ordinance by prior resolution.

    But, he said, the Council could ratify it retroactively.

    "If [the city council] chooses to not ratify the agreement, we would provide additional guidance as requested by the council," said a spokesperson for Sanders in a previous NBC San Diego article. "As for the date this will be discussed, the Council President controls the agenda."

    Monday afternoon, this response to the citizen's arrest attempt came from the mayor's press secretary: "Thoroughly ridiculous".

    The district attorney's spokesman issued a statement saying any "concerns about suspected illegal behavior by elected officials or government organizations" are "welcome", to be reviewed by the D-A's Public Integrity Unit.

    Leading the group of occupiers  was Ray Lutz, former congressional candidate and Occupy SD activist. He has taken many legal jabs at the city for their handling of the Occupy movement in San Diego.

    "Qualcomm should pay market prices for this," Lutz told reporters in the lobby of Goldsmith's office.

    "And it should be understandable for everybody in the public about how this deal makes sense. Right now, it makes no sense at all."