'LifeLogging' Changing the Digital Landscape

Looking like Big Brother with small camera

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A tiny camera lets people document every minute of their life, known as "life logging". Consumer Bob talks to Scott Peterson and Dr. Rebecca Nee about the growing trend. (Published Friday, Mar 22, 2013)

    It reminds you of a scene out of "1984" or "Brave New World", a scene where people are wearing small digital cameras on their clothes that take pictures during every part  of their day.   It is a camera that takes pictures without you ever pushing a button.

    In reality, this is how a new set of small digital cameras will work that could become very popular in social media circles.  In fact it has a name, "LifeLogging", where people can post pictures or slide shows from their daily life.

    Camera Captures All of Life's Moments

    [DGO] Camera Captures All of Life's Moments
    A tiny camera lets people document every minute of their life, known as "life logging". Consumer Bob talks to Scott Peterson and Dr. Rebecca Nee about the growing trend. (Published Friday, Mar 22, 2013)

    "It's basically eliminating the human element of taking pictures," said Scott Peterson withGap Intelligence.  This digital analyst is talking about the cameras created by Memoto and OMG Life that can be worn around your neck or attached to your jacket, pants or purse and will automatically take pictures throughout your day.  The pictures can then be turned into a fast moving slide-show.

    "The more we are in tune with Facebook, the more people want to share," said Peterson.  But Digital Media Professor Rebecca Nee from San Diego State University says technology like this should come with a warning label.

    "My biggest concern would be young people who see the world of social media as a big playground and don't see the repercussions or consequences," said Rebecca Nee.

    But not every young person likes the idea.

    College student Taylor De Klerk says it sort of "creeps" her out, adding: "I don't want people recording me when I'm meandering through my daily life." 

    But student Kevin Herr says he would give it a try.

    "It would be very fun to get a good log of your life and really categorize it," said Herr.

     The Memoto camera is taking pre-orders for $279 dollars and could be on the market by May.