Family Pleads for Clues to Son's Motorcycle Hit-and-Run Death

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    NEWSLETTERS

    NBC 7's Artie Ojeda reports on one family's hope that the person involved in a crash that killed Alnabil Aming on northbound on Interstate 15 near Highway 76 will come forward. (Published Tuesday, Jul 29, 2014)

    A family is pleading for witnesses to come forward with information about a hit-and-run crash that killed their son. 

     Alnabil Aming had served in the Army for more than seven years, including deployments to Afghanistan and Iraq.

    The 28-year-old returned home in January, hoping to making a better life for himself.

    On July 22, while riding his motorcycle to school, his life was cut short by a hit-and-run driver, who still has not been found. His family is making a plea for that driver to come forward.

    “If the driver has a good faith in God and his conscience, he or she must come forward,” said Rosalinda Aming, while clutching a photo of her son.

    According to the CHP, Aming was struck around 5:40 p.m. while riding his 2011 Yamaha R-1 Motorcycle northbound on Interstate 15. He was splitting traffic between two lanes at approximately 30-35 mph.

    An unidentified, cream-colored sedan was changing lanes and struck Aming. He was ejected and then struck by a box truck. Aming died at the scene.

    “We know he’s in a better life and he’s happy watching us right now, and telling us also, 'Don’t worry about me, I’ll be fine,'” said his brother Allin.

    Alnabil Aming, who has a wife in Germany, was studying to become a diesel mechanic.

    He was attending a technical school in Rancho Cucamonga and was making a two-hour drive to school every day. The long drive concerned his brother.

    “I even told him if he wants to get a room up there, I can help him find it. He said 'no, I’m okay,'” said Allin Aming.

    Right now, the CHP says no one has come forward with any clues and are asking anyone with information to call the Oceanside office at (760) 757-1675 or the CHP Communications Center at (858) 637-3800.