Expert Warns Shoppers of Continued Security Risks at Retailers

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    NEWSLETTERS

    As retailers continue to do damage control after recent security breaches, an expert is warning shoppers that similar attacks are likely to continue. NBC 7's Elena Gomez reports.

    As retailers continue to do damage control after recent security breaches, an expert is warning shoppers that similar attacks are likely to continue.

    It's been a long road for retailers in recent weeks.

    At least 110 million Target shoppers were the first to get the news that their personal information could be stolen by cyber hackers and Neiman Marcus Group Ltd. recently announced a data breach of its own.

    All of this could be just the beginning of more stores bringing the same bad news to their customers says Dr. Murray Jennex, Professor of Management Information Systems at San Diego State University.

    Expert Warns Shoppers of Continued Security Risks at Retailers

    [DGO] Expert Warns Shoppers of Continued Security Risks at Retailers
    As retailers continue to do damage control after recent security breaches, an expert is warning shoppers that similar attacks are likely to continue. NBC 7's Elena Gomez reports.

    Dr. Jennex says consumers may see more of this kind of news coming as stores begin looking into their data for possible breaches.

    "[Retailers] have to wonder if they have been ...all stores will have to check their systems. Several chains getting hit is a wide spread problem."

    News has come out that the breach at Target and Neiman Marcus may be part of a broader scam.

    Dr. Jennex believes this security breach could be the biggest of its kind since TJ MAXX's hack just four years ago.

    "I have to assume as a consumer anytime I use my [card] that there is a potential to get hacked and data to be stolen," Dr. Jennex said.

    Neiman Marcus spokespeople say the security breach in their system went undetected for six months.

    Meanwhile, on Saturday news broke that a cyber-security company called IntelCrawler identified a 17-year-old from Russia as the person believed to be the alleged mastermind behind the virus.

    The virus reportedly worked by stealing personal data as soon as the customer swiped their card, taking card numbers, pins, phone numbers, and emails.

    Dr. Jennex warns consumers to be on alert when shopping, but also to go back and check their data for inaccuracies.

    "Keep good paper records to know what your charges are to easily dispute anything that comes up," Dr. Jennex suggested.

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