E-Cigarette Study Causes Firestorm of Controversy

More people, especially young children, are falling ill after coming in contact with the liquid nicotine or juice found inside e-cigarettes

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    NEWSLETTERS

    NBC 7's Omari Fleming reports on the number of calls involving liquid nicotine poisoning and the possible connection to the new interest in vaping.

    Aaron Han's been cigarette free for at least two years.

    "I was a cigarette smoker for 7 years," he says while puffing on an electronic cigarette at the Vape Shoppe and Lounge in Hillcrest.

    He credits vaping for helping him to kick the habit.

    Oceanside Passes Ordinance Banning E-Cigs

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    The Oceanside City Council passed an ordinance that would restrict the use of electronic cigarettes where traditional cigarettes are already banned. NBC 7's Megan Tevrizian reports.

    “It curbs the need for smoking cigarettes and the nicotine," he said.

    As much as the new vice may be helping former smokers, data released today by the Centers for Disease Control-- regarding e-cigarettes is creating a firestorm of controversy.

    A study notes that an increasing number of people, especially young children, are falling ill after coming in contact with the liquid nicotine or juice found inside .

    Because of the high concentration of nicotine, the very toxic liquid can be extremely dangerous if someone touches it or accidentally swallows it.

    The CDC report found on average just one phone call per month to a poison center related to e-cigarettes in 2010.

    That jumped exponentially to more than 200-per month early this year. Most of the calls involving children under the age 6.

    Jesse Kovacs owns the Liquid Lounge in the Gaslamp District.

    He's not blowing off children's safety concerns but says parental supervision is key.

    “If it’s any other liquid like bleach you have under bathroom counter you have to be mindful
    of it because you never know if you have young kids and they can get into it and it can be harmful," said Kovacs.

    The California Poison Control System says e-cigarette related calls are on the rise in the state.

    So far more than 140 since 2013.

    They say a quarter of those likely from a four-county area that includes San Diego. 

    As it stands now the refill bottles don’t have child-proof tops like aspiring or prescription drugs.