Drug Smugglers Turning to Teenage Mules

Border officials see huge increase in juvenile drug smuggling.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    CBP
    Loose fitting clothing conceals the drugs as they try to walk through the port of entry.

    Drug smugglers are increasingly recruiting teenage students to bring drugs across the Mexican border, taping marijuana, cocaine and methamphetamine to their bodies, according to federal officials.

    Officials have caught three times as many teenage drug mules this year compared to last, and have taken startling pictures of the youngsters with drugs strapped to their backs.

    Drug Smugglers "Taping" Teens at the Border

    [DGO] Drug Smugglers "Taping" Teens at the Border
    Border officials see huge increase in juvenile drug smuggling

    "From August of 2008 through March of 2009, we've seen an 800% increase just at the San Ysidro port of entry alone," said Angelica De Cima with Customs and Border Protection.

    She said there has been a 300% increase at the Otay Mesa port of entry.

    Students are recruited at schools and parties, offered $100 to $200 per run, officials said. Drug smugglers convince the teens that they won't get in trouble because they're minors. They provide loose-fitting clothing to conceal the drugs during the border cross.

    "Quick cash, no consequences, and that's just not true," said De Cima.

    In fact, the juveniles face transportation and possession with intent to sell charges. The penalty could include a trip to juvenile hall and possible time in a youth prison.

    Amy Isackson, who has followed this story for KPBS, spoke with a teen who talked about the smuggling as a status symbol.

    "She was saying you get new stuff, she talked about her friend who was getting new purses, but she was also talking about this cultural aspect: that it's really seen as 'in' and its seen as 'cool’,” Isackson said.

    Students at schools in San Ysidro have been recruited and caught, according to border officials. They're now putting together an education campaign designed to warn students of the consequences.