Case Closed After PB Couple Finds Missing Coins | NBC 7 San Diego

Case Closed After PB Couple Finds Missing Coins

Almost a year after NBC 7 Responds' story aired, a Pacific Beach couple said they cracked the case on hundreds of dollars’ worth of missing coins.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    NBC 7's Consumer Bob shares the conclusion to the case of the missing coins, a story NBC 7 Responds covered on a Pacific Beach couple one year ago. (Published Thursday, June 29, 2017)

    “Absolutely, no question, there were a thousand coins in there,” Robin Woodley told NBC 7 Responds last July. 

    That’s how this NBC 7 Responds story began when Robin Woodley told us his wife Deborah had taken a thousand half dollar coins to their local Union Bank of California in Pacific Beach. 

    The couple expected the bank to credit them $500 when the bank teller handed them a receipt for the amount, but that didn’t happen. 

    “Not a single one was lost, ever, we are very meticulous in what we do,” Robin said. 

    This South African native, who has lived in San Diego for 44 years, said when the bank counted the coins, it did not credit his account with the full amount. According to Union Bank, the teller’s count showed the Woodley’s dropped off less than $250 in coins. 

    “Maybe some customer got a bonus of $250, I don’t know,” Deborah said. 

    Robin and Deborah contacted NBC 7 Responds and we contacted officials at Union Bank, who stood by their accounting. But since the Woodleys had a 20-year relationship with the bank, representatives offered the couple a courtesy credit to their account for the full amount. 

    The story doesn’t end there. This month, NBC 7 Responds received a letter from the Woodleys saying after nearly a year, they found the missing coins in a box at their home. The Woodleys said they feel terrible and apologized both to NBC 7 Responds and to Union Bank, offering to pay back the money the bank credited them. 

    NBC 7 Responds contacted Union Bank with the new information and a spokesperson said because Robin and Deborah were honest about the mistake, the couple could keep the original credit they received. 

    In an email, a spokesperson for Union Bank said, “We value Mr. and Mrs. Woodley as Union Bank clients and truly appreciate the honesty and integrity they have demonstrated by reaching out to apologize and clarify the situation nearly a year later. There is no need to return the credit we issued last year, we are just happy they found their missing coins and we look forward to continuing to serve their future financial needs.”