California Would Lose $500 Million Under Sequestration

If Congress doesn't reach a deal, the state will lose funding for schools, public health and the military

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Marines at March Air Reserve Base in Riverside County are "preparing for the worst, but hoping for the best" when it comes to automatic budget cuts that will slash funding to the base, if Congress can’t reach a deal by Friday. Jacob Rascon reports from March Air Reserve Base for the NBC4 News at 5 p.m. on Feb. 25, 2013. (Published Monday, Feb 25, 2013)

    If Congress fails to reach a budget deal this week, California will lose more than $500 million in funding for schools, the military, disability services and other federal spending, according to a report released by the White House.

    More: Specifics on how California will be affected

    The steep cuts, put into place in 2011 as a way to dissuade the ever-feuding Democrats and Republicans in Washington from refusing to reach a deal, are set to go into effect March 1. They have become known in politcal jargon as "sequester cuts," or "sequestration."

    In California, the cuts would trim $87.6 million in federal funding for primary and secondary education, and $62.9 million from special education, the Obama Administration’s report said.

    About 10,000 college work-study jobs be eliminated, along with spots for 8,200 children in the public preschool programs Head Start and Early Head Start, the White House report said.

    In addition, 64,000 civilian defense employees would be furloughed for some period of time, and army base operations would lose about $54 million in California, the report said.
    About $3 million in funds for job support for the unemployed would also be affected.

    The administration’s decision to release the report on Monday was part of a nationwide media blitz aimed at persuading Republicans to sign on to a deal. Some Democrats have also opposed compromise on issues that are keeping the two sides apart.