CSU to Caution Prospective Students

Letters will warn students about budget cuts if Prop 30 does not pass in November

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Cal State University leaders will send a letter to students when they apply, warning them that some spots may not be available is Prop 30 does not pass.

    Students applying to California State University schools will receive a letter cautioning them about the availability of spots for the 2013-2014 academic year, according to a report.

    Applicants will be warned that some spots could be taken away if Proposition 30 does not pass in November, according to the Los Angeles Times.

    Proposition 30 would raise the state sales tax by a quarter cent for four years and raise taxes on incomes over $250,000 for seven years to help close California's budget deficit.

    The letter to prospective students would warn them about cuts to the education budget

    Prop 30: New Taxes for School, Public Safety Funding Initiative

    [DGO] Prop 30: New Taxes for School, Public Safety Funding Initiative
    Prop. 30 tops the list of state ballot measures. Clare Crawford, executive director of the Center on Policy Initiatives, and Richard Rider, founder and president of San Diego Tax Fighters discuss the ballot measure with NBC 7's Gene Cubbison on Politically Speaking.

    "Because enrollment capacity is tied to the amount of available state funding, the campuses will be able to admit more applicants if Proposition 30 passes and fewer applicants if the proposition fails," a draft of a letter to CSU Monterey Bay applicants states in LA Times.

    The letter will then include a link to Prop 30’s “Yes” and “No” campaigns.

    Gov. Jerry Brown is campaigning hard for the initiative saying it’s the only way to avoid billions of dollars in cuts to schools and higher education.

    "If Proposition 30 passes, you'll have more classes, and fewer classes will be cut," Brown told San Diego students in August.  "Prop 30 is asking the most blessed to pay a little bit more money."

    CSU officials told LA Times that each university, including local state schools such as San Diego State University and California State University San Marcos, will send out their own version of the letter.

    "We wanted to give students and parents some sense of context as to why we are [holding] applications until the end of November," CSU spokesperson Claudia Keith told LA Times. "We are not advocating one way or the other. We are just laying out the facts of what the budget is and what impact this will have on our budget."