Bin Laden's Demise a "Good Thing": SDSU Prof

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Getty Images
    WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 01: Students gather at the fence on the north side of the White House, pose for photographs, chant "U.S.A.! U.S.A.!" and sing the Star Spangled Banner May 1, 2011 in Washington, DC. U.S. President Barack Obama will reportedly announce the death of Osama Bin Laden during a late evening statement to the press in the East Room of the White House. Bin Laden has reportedly been killed in Islamabad, Pakistan, almost a decade after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and his body is in possession of the United States. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

    As details of the operation that resulted in the death of 9/11 mastermind Osama bin Laden come to light, questions about where this leaves the worldwide war on terror are beginning a search for answers.

    San Diego State University professor Dipak Gupta, Ph.D. is concerned the Pakistani regime and military may be in for some serious reprisals from Jihadists and extremists.

    As for the world at large, Gupta said, "Even the most fervent Jihadis, they do not have a plan an immediate plan to go out and retaliate.

    “It takes a lot of preparation particularly in the West, to come and a do, carry out a terrorist act."

    Professor Dipak Gupta warns, however, that in Pakistan and other countries where bin Laden's brand of Islamic extremism is deeply rooted, that moves to exact revenge against American and allied interests could more readily be carried out.

    He says bin Laden's death -- reportedly while exchanging gunfire with the U.S. forces -- could serve the cause of martyrdom for generations to come.

    But now that he's gone, if not his all his loyalists and operatives, Gupta sees a light at the end of the tunnel for an exit strategy.

    "We can say that yes, our military objective has been achieved. And therefore, we may be able to come out of Afghanistan with our heads held high.”

    Dr. Gupta used the Martha Stewart line, "it's a good thing," to summarize the demise of bin Laden.

    But he cautions: there's a legion of people still out there with bad intentions.

    They'll keep trying to do the U.S. harm as they have.

    So the war against terror is still to be fought ever vigilantly.