Bilingual Monument to Honor Diverse Vets from Logan Heights

Chicano Park statue will feature a bilingual message of appreciation for local vets

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    The Logan Heights Veterans Memorial Monument doesn't exist yet, but the community working for its construction is nevertheless dedicated to raising awareness for a unique group of vets.

    The veterans with the Logan Heights Veterans Memorial committee have spent the last eight years working to build a memorial that will honor the diverse group of veterans who grew up in Logan Heights.

    “Logan’s been around since 1911. A lot of people come back, so we want them to come here and admire and respect what we have; our history and community,” said the committee’s Vice Chairman Frank Peralta.

    The veterans who will be honored in the 5-foot-tall polished granite memorial served in wars from WWI to Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    While the monument will include bilingual language to honor the predominantly Latino group, it will also honor the African American and Asian Veterans who contribute to the community’s diverse makeup.

    The plan was approved by the city in February. Peralta has been working to get the plans approved and money raised for five years -- before that, his friend and fellow veteran contributed another three years. Since the committee started planning, 27 veterans in Logan Heights have passed away, so the pressure is on to raise enough money to complete it, he said.

    “It took a long time to get this thing on the right road,” he said. “Now we just need to raise enough money to complete it.”

    The monument will cost around $25,000, Peralta said. The committee has raised around $8,000 so far, but has been at a standstill with fundraising.

    Peralta emphasized that getting as far as the committee has in planning the memorial has been a group effort, not only by the committee, but in public support. He said the donations which stand out to him are from members of the community who have since moved away, but still look fondly back to Logan Heights, said Peralta, who has also moved away since growing up and serving in Vietnam.

    He still goes to church every Sunday in Logan Heights, where he runs into fellow veterans. Some remember his father, who also served.

    “Even though you leave Logan, you always go back,” he said.

    For more information on how to donate or find out more, check out the committee’s website.
     

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