Another Reason to Whine About June Gloom

Vegetable and fruit gardens may suffer, but San Diegans will be okay

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    “All that overnight moisture encourages plant diseases, like rust and mold on roses,” said Vincent Lazaneo, herb and horticulture advisor for the UC cooperative extension in San Diego County

    June Gloom is the cause of many a furrowed brow in San Diego, and locals and tourists alike have reason to be upset with the normally present sunshine.

    But if they thought they had it bad, consider the strawberry.

    “Without drizzle, there’s overnight condensation and that extra moisture might cause fruit such as strawberries to rot quicker,” said Vincent Lazaneo, herb and horticulture advisor for the UC cooperative extension in San Diego County.

    Gardeners in San Diego may do well to stay home from the overcast beach to tend to their sprouts, he said. The increased moisture also affects plant health.

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    “All that overnight moisture encourages plant diseases, like rust and mold on roses.”

    Lazaneo said that most gardens can make it through the gloom. It’s the gardeners themselves that he worries about.

    “It probably affects people more,” he said.

    The infamous “June Gloom” occurs when pressure overhead is high. Combined with the cool ocean water, the pressure causes the clouds to form and stick around, said Sam Iacobellis, a specialist in climatology at the Scripps Institution.

    “Clouds form when the air is cooling. During the day as things warm up, they evaporate,” he said. Usually, they go away by the afternoon.

    On the bright side – pun intended – Iacobellis said San Diegans can probably look forward to decreased air conditioner usage; a lower electricity bill.