'Bolder Than Most' Rapist to Face New Trial

New trial will determine whether Alvin Ray Quarles should be sent to a state hospital for sex offenders

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    A convicted serial rapist will stay in custody, even though he's served his prison time. A judge ruled Thursday that Alvin Ray Quarles will have a new trial to determine whether he should be committed to a state hospital for sex offenders. NBC 7's Artie Ojeda reports.

    A convicted serial rapist will stay in custody even though he's served his prison time a San Diego judge ruled Thursday.

    Alvin Ray Quarles will have a new trial to determine whether he should now be committed to a state hospital for sex offenders.

    Quarles was called the "Bolder Than Most" rapist who would sometimes force his victim's husbands or boyfriends to watch his attacks.

    Bolder Rapist To Stay in Custody

    [DGO]Bolder Rapist To Stay in Custody
    A convicted serial rapist will stay in custody, even though he's served his prison time. A judge ruled Thursday that Alvin Ray Quarles will have a new trial to determine whether he should be committed to a state hospital for sex offenders. NBC 7's Artie Ojeda reports.

    In 1989, Quarles pleaded guilty to four counts of rape and other counts of burglary and robbery and was sentenced to 50 years in prison.

    Now 51, Quarles was set for parole.

    Rapist's Victims Protest Possible Early Release

    [DGO] Rapist's Victims Protest Possible Early Release
    Two women who were victims of convicted rapist Alvin Quarles are trying to keep him from being released early from prison. NBC 7’s Elena Gomez reports.

    Under the law in effect when he was sentenced, he could be paroled after serving only half of his sentence.

    His victims say he doesn't deserve freedom.

    ‘He gets out, do I think he will do it again? Absolutely. Do I have any doubt he's a sexual predator? None at all,” said Mary Taylor.

    Thursday’s hearing was driven by two of Quarles' victims once they heard he was going to be released.

    Victim Cynthia Medina said it’s a painful, but necessary process.

    “I feel like I'm getting some power back that he took away from me and it's painful but I'll get through it,” Medina said.

    Prosecutors argued Quarles met the legal criteria of being a sexually violent predator.

    A judge agreed and said another trial will be held to determine whether Quarles should be sent to a state hospital for sex offenders.

    Once this case goes to trial, a jury will decide whether Quarles will be committed to a state hospital for sex offenders. If that happens, it's not clear how long he would stay confined.