Affordable Housing High-Rise Reaches New Heights

Celadon received its last steel beam Friday during a "topping out" ceremony

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Celadon webcam
    Construction continues on Celadon, expected to be finished by Feb. 2015.

     San Diego’s latest high-rise, a 17-story affordable housing complex, passed a milestone this week as the last steel beam was put into place.

    Developers held a “topping out” ceremony downtown Friday for Celadon at 9th Street and Broadway, a 250-apartment building developed by nonprofit BRIDGE Housing.

    Slated to be finished in Feb. 2015, Celadon will be opened to individuals and small families, BRIDGE Housing officials say. A two-person household cannot make more than $38,700 a year to qualify for the lower monthly rents, which range from $408 to $879, depending on income, household and apartment size.

    Eighty-eight of the apartments will be set aside for supportive housing: 25 units will go to youth aging out of foster care and adults in the Mental Health Services Act housing program (MHSA), and 63 will be targeted for seniors under the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly.

    The building’s plan includes two community rooms, a community kitchen, laundry rooms and outdoor space with a community garden.

    Expected to be LEED Silver certified, the design includes solar panels to cover part of the electric costs and an eco-roof with drought-tolerant plants.

    Celadon has an estimated cost of $76 million, with an estimated $2.8 million coming from MHSA capital funds, according to the county’s MHSA website.

    As for the rest of the funding, the project is being paid for by the City of San Diego, California Department of Housing and Community Development, California Housing Finance Agency, County of San Diego’s Behavioral Health Services division, San Diego Housing Commission and US Bank, according to BRIDGE Housing.

    A webcam shows daily updates from the Celadon construction site, including a time-lapse from the start of the ground floor to the “topping out.”